April 22nd, 2019 Lansing Committee of the Whole Meeting

April 22nd, 2019 Lansing Committee of the Whole Meeting


yeah six weeks I would like to call to order the
committee of a whole for April 22nd and if the clerk please read the roll
council member would hear mattress pad for House member Washington Council
member Hussein council members Fitz Lee yeah council member Dunbar council
member Garza comes in my projector we have a quorum this is an opportunity for
public comment we do not have anyone in our audience at this point for public
comment so what we will do is move to we have the minutes of April 15th vice
president Spadafore Madam President I move the adoption of the minutes from
April 15th 2019 I have a motion on the minutes are there any questions or
concerns about the minutes seeing none all those in favor say aye aye opposed
same sign passes unanimously we will now start on
our departmental presentations this evening we have the police department
Human Relations and community service in information technology so we welcome the
chief who’s with us at this time as well as from excuse me the Board of
Commissioners Clyde Carnegie and I’m assuming the gentleman sitting with you
is your new financial person is that correct that is correct I was gonna
introduce some here in a second as well all right thank you so we will turn it
over to you at this time okay well good evening I want to thank you for the
opportunity to present LP DS FY 20 but here this evening Madam President
members of City Council and the citizens of Lansing as the chief of police for
the capital city I’m honored to present to you the fy2014 Singh Police
Department deceive me and I am joined by the budget
chair committee police board Commissioner Clyde Carnegie in our new
Budget Control supervisor Joe McClure I also want to thank all the members of
the police Porter commissioners for all their dedication and commitment to
serving our citizens here in the city of Lansing and also providing that support
to the Lansing Police Department I would also like to acknowledge our former LPD
Budget Control supervisor Jim Deline Jim put a lot of work and effort into this
FY 20 but till we hired Joe here a couple months
ago I would also like to thank mayor Andy Shore for his continued support and
commitment to the Lansing Police Department he’s always made public
safety his top priority and we appreciate his commitment to the Lansing
Police Department as well would also like to thank city council for your
continued support of departmental by providing us equipment and resources and
tools in order for us to keep our our city safe the Lansing Police Department
is honored to serve our community we’ve been blessed with the long-standing
history of community support and a willingness to foster solid partnerships
with the police department we are grateful for the confidence and trust
they have put in us to keep their family safe and their businesses secure I would
also be remiss if I did not think the ones who wear the badge that put their
lives on the line each and every day you know every day I’m amazed on the courage
the professionalism and the kindness that our officers demonstrate and I’m
proud of the men and women the Lansing Police Department and will forever be
grateful for the work they do each and every day in putting together the FY
2008 every dollar allocated was reviewed and
justified to ensure that it reflects the mission vision and values of the Lansing
Police Department I’m pleased to announce that LPGs FY 20 but will
continue to provide all the core services delivered by the police
department while we continue to keep the city safe
I am going to move on to the PowerPoint presentation that you have in front of
you and for our citizens at home as I mentioned a little bit earlier our
Police Board of Commissioners I think that this is gets overlooked from for
many times this is our civilian oversight for the organization we have
eight citizens here in the city of Lansing that have dedicated and
volunteered their time to support our citizens in our Police Department and I
just wanted to acknowledge them and thank them for their continued service
when you look at the Lansing Police Department’s mission statement it’s
pretty simple and everything we do we apply to this it’s to maintain order
preserve Public Safety in a foster a better quality of life making our city a
better place to live work and visit you talk about that vision we know that we
can’t do it without our community and so it’s about building partnerships and
utilizing innovative strategies for a safer stronger community several years
ago we put into our budget as the president’s task force came out on 21st
century policing back in 2015 and there were six main pillars that was really
put towards law enforcement to try and focus are our strategies our resources
are our budgets and I’m not going to read all six of those pillars but those
are in front of you and I can tell you that all six of those pillars are
addressed in our FY 20 but when you talk about our philosophy it really comes
down to two foundations for the Lansing Police Department
it’s about police legitimacy and community policing everything that we
build off of our strategies and our interactions and interventions with our
citizens it comes down to those two solid foundations in order for us to
accomplish our mission it really starts and ends with the preservation of life
and that means everyone that we come in contact with every intervention every
shift we want to make sure that everyone goes home to the loved ones not only our
police officers but everyone we come in contact with and again utilizing that
community policing that commune engagement model what we build so much
of our day-to-day interactions off but we implement a crime-fighting strategy
that really focuses on technology crime analysis and dedicated police or
services whether it’s a visible police officer in a neighborhood a detective
going one-on-one with a victim and a witness or any of our support staff that
we utilize each and every day we really base that upon a smart policing model a
data-driven approach where we continue to work with our neighborhoods our
businesses and schools to build those strong partnerships throughout the year
I’m gonna stop it apparently we’re about a slide behind so okay so at this point
for City TV I before I move forward on the details of the FY 2008 I do want to
wrap up 2018 I have a really short video that I’d like to play for you okay well I know you didn’t hear the
music but there is music attached to that video but we will send that out and
they’ll be on our website as also so in there you can see a lot of community
engagement and that’s a lot what our police officers do each and every day so
moving on to the FY 2010 if you look at it’s going to be slide number 11 when
you look at the money that is set aside for the city general fund it’s about a
hundred and thirty nine point five million dollars the police departments
got about thirty two percent of that or forty four point eight million dollars
when you look at our general fund budget there’s two numbers there there is the
general fund which is at forty four million eight hundred eighty five
thousand and then our overall budget is at forty five million nine hundred and
eighty six that second number that overall budget includes our drug
forfeiture accounts the federal state and try County Metro so that’s the
that’s the difference between those two accounts when you look at the FY 2010
we’ve been very grateful very lucky and and supported by the members of not only
City Council the mayor but our citizens and our millage that passed for the
second time that puts 3.2 million dollars into our FY 20 but at one point
five mils please to also announce that a hundred percent of that millage is also
going towards personnel so the money from the millage is going to police
officers when you look at the general fund dollars increased and I’m on slide
14 at this point that’s about a three point nine increase or 1.7 million
dollars again that’s for salary benefits over time and operating and a few
equipment costs so that’s where the three point nine percent increase comes
from when you look at our proposed budget it also entails all of our core
services and when you look at those personnel we have 244 total employees
203 sworn employees and 41 civilians I’m on slide 16 at this point when you
look at our personnel cost eighty five percent eighty five percent of our
budget is for bodies that’s our personnel so when you look at the
totality of our our budget the majority of it is our police officers our
detectives our support staff that is about a two point three percent increase
over last year and I want to just mention in there
yes it’s an increase for salary and fringe benefits but we did have a
transition in leadership with the parking enforcement division and so we
were getting a portion of that from the parking Enterprise Fund that is now back
to the general fund that sergeant is back into the LPD budget for FY 2008 in
cost it’s about six million six hundred and thirty-four thousand it’s about 15%
of our general fund budget when you break that down even further it’s about
a three percent increase for FY 20 on our operating costs of about a hundred
and ninety one thousand two hundred and seventy two dollars that’s the three
percent increase the reason for those increases was for IT technology needs
some uniforms invest the cost of buying that has gone up if you don’t get as
much federal dollars for our vest anymore cost of equipment and just
really making an organizational change is that we took the school crossing
guards from personnel and pushed that over to the operating cost that is done
on a contract with a vendor so we don’t have city employees we use a vendor to
make sure that we have our crossing guards staffed I’m on slide 19 if you’re
following along this is for the equipment budget when you look at our
equipment costs for FY 21 drew forty-four thousand dollars just a few
of the items that are in there we need to get some replacement Tasers
replacement canines we’re going through some transition with our dogs retiring
and some promotions our dive unit needed some replacement suits we we are also
asking for a robot for our tactical team as you can imagine as we try and utilize
different tools different strategies so we’re not putting bodies in front of
confrontations the robot has the ability to deliver a phone it has the ability to
have a camera on it it has the ability to open doors and so again this is one
of those those life-saving tools that we think is needed for our tactical team
another issue that we have really progressed on is the ability to utilize
smartphones in the field so so many of our officers in the department use a
cell phone on a day-to-day basis so the goal here is to get every uniformed
police officer a smartphone so they can do their their day-to-day their shift
business whether it’s making phone calls utilizing the technology especially the
body worn cameras the in-car fleet they can tag photos they can download videos
it’s been really a cost-effective creating efficiencies within the
organization the other one I wanted to highlight was also a videophone for our
start negotiators if you look at technology again the ability to have a
camera on the other end of that phone rather than just utilizing the phone
gives us a tactical advantage if you will when we have these types of
situations so that’s just a brief recap of some of the equipment cost that we
have for the FY 2008 as far as capital improvements for FY 2013 police
department is is asking for the first one is replacement of our incar
computers they are currently at a warranty they’re wrapping up here in
July they will be out of warranty after four years and so we did ask for two
hundred and seventy five thousand dollars to replace those in car
computers and as you can imagine it really is one of those vital pieces of
equipment that our officers use not only for the 911 calls that they get
but our records management system RNC for street-smart the video cameras that
we utilize the the body-worn cameras and so again just like with anything else
technology needs to be replaced and so that’s one of the capital improvement
plans for FY 22 that are in there the first one is trying to create some
additional efficiencies and effectiveness of our special operations
section which currently is housed off-site we’re trying to bring them back
into the LPD ops center and we’re also at a unique time as you you’ve probably
heard throughout the year that forfeiture dollars are being utilized in
the rules and the regulations that go around forfeiture all drug units in the
state of Michigan are gonna really struggle to utilize the same financing
model the funding mechanisms that they’ve had in place so we’re trying to
cut cost create some synergy between both of the drug units and putting them
together at the OP Center the other one is for replacement of two of our
accelerators at the shooting range the shooting range was built in 1998 and I
want to kind of clarify that a little bit there’s a structure that was built
prior to 1998 housed our helicopters that we no longer have but the range was
replaced it was an outdoor range and was built with a lot of concrete well these
decelerators there’s four of them and two of them are at failure that need to
be replaced this fiscal year and the other two we’re gonna put in some
repairs but they’re also going to need to be replaced here in the near future
so we are replacing two of those in the FY 2010 I would point out for both of
these items we are gonna be utilizing some of our forfeiture dollars for these
two items moving on the slide 22 good news we are asking to add another
community policing officer we currently have ten authorized police officers
for our community policing areas and we are asking to add on eleventh position
so much of what we do on a daily basis we rely on our citizens we rely on our
support staff to help our police officers and detectives in today’s day
and age to not have a crime Analysis Unit for a city our size the deal with
our crime issues you got a you got to be able to have that support staff to give
the tools to the officers so they can actually go out in the field and do the
job so we’re doing a little bit of a unique thing here we are very fortunate
to have Michigan State University one of the best criminal justice programs in
the country just down the street from us and so we’ve been working with Michigan
State University and we have proposed to enter our partnership with them on a
graduate level crime analysis paid internship program these are going to be
high level crime analysts that are working towards PhDs and they’re gonna
spend time embed it with the Lansing Police Department and so we’re asking to
utilize some funds to to hire two of those on a contract basis in FY 2018
turns from the Michigan State University program and of course some of you are
familiar with our Police Athletic League which has been around for a long time we
are going through just a little bit of a reinvention of our Police Athletic
League not to get into a lot of details we’re just looking to really
re-energized what that program can do for our youth here in the community and
so we did put some money set aside we want to thank now retired detective
Michelle Bryant who ran it for so many years retired in the last year or so so
we’ve asked for a small amount to get that rejuvenated it’s going to be really
in concert with some other things that are going on here in the city of Lansing
but there’s a connection with our youth to our police officers I did want to
touch a little bit on LPD hiring in 2018 in 2019 so as you can
imagine in my tenure now which is now six years we have hired 123
police officers in six years so it comes with a few challenges and we’ve had a
few learning lessons along the way but I’m pleased to say because of our
partnership with the HR department we have now been recognized as a national
best practice for recruiting and hiring police officers in the country we
recently presented at the police executive Research Forum and I actually
do present for Michigan State University so I think the model here in Lansing is
really being replicated throughout the country as some of the best practices so
just to kind of break that down just in 2018 and into 2019 that we have either
either hired or in the process of completing the hiring process here in
Maine June 38 police officers 60 tension officers three cadets a police social
worker and you got to meet Joe McClure here a couple minutes ago a Budget
Control supervisor – secretary 26 is with with a third one getting set to
start here in April and three police TAC 26 is which really spend a lot of our
time their time going through our Freedom of Information request down on
Central Records so that’s a lot of hiring in a year and four months time
frame a little bit of a recap again we focus a lot on gun violence here in the
city of Lansing and I just wanted to point out again in 2013 we were
averaging over 200 shootings a year and the shootings are really broken down in
several different categories this is not all victims but these are all shootings
that we can verify that a firearm was discharged in the city in 2018 our
number was at 104 so we have reduced shootings here in the city of Lansing
since 2013 by almost 50% we entered into a secured city partnership with the
Michigan State Police and I just wanted to give you a brief update on those four
focus areas those four focus areas were Churchill Downs Baker Street Comstock
Park Northtown as a result of our partnership
the Michigan State Police we’ve seen a 17 percent decrease in violent crime in
those four areas three out of the four all saw and anywhere from 15 to 24
percent reductions in violent crime and we did have a small little increase in
North Town at 2.7 percent when we really break that down a little bit more that’s
a result of aggravated assaults more than anything else I think it’s always
important that you know we share our goals not only internally but also
externally and the number one goal as I’ve mentioned before is that
preservation of life making sure that everyone goes home our goal is to also
reduce homicides by 15% have a homicide clearance rate of 85
percent or higher and I will tell you the national average the national
average for homicide clearance rate is 59 percent last year we we hit our
target of eighty five percent and again I think that speaks to the relationship
that we have with our community members the trust that they have at the police
department is going to utilize every resource but in as many hours as it
takes to to make sure that justice is there for the families involved when we
look at our violent crime again our goal is to reduce it by 15 percent along with
our shootings I’m Paige our slide 27 just to continue we want to reduce our
aggravated assaults to below 875 when we look at our aggravated assaults a lot of
that is due to domestic violence as well and so then that the seventh goal there
is to decrease the domestic violence by 15 percent we are in the process of
trying to implement and complete that implementation of our first phase of a
real-time crime Center I think when you look at technology that is available and
to put the resources into a space that you can provide that real-time crime
intelligence video radio social media into the hands of the police officers
that gives us an advantage of solving crimes and bringing justice at a faster
pace we would also we have plans to complete
our three-year strategic plan in FY 2010 there’s a couple things that we’ve
already started the implementation on NC for sweet smart and that is another
computer tool that goes into the hands of our police officers and detectives
either in the car or at their desktop a mobile PDS app our smartphones and then
a satisfaction survey for our citizens again also in FY 2019 several new
community policing and crime prevention initiatives again while expanding and
relying on our partnerships and growing those partnerships with our violent
crime initiative our MSP secured city partnership our public safety
partnership which is our national program and then of course we have ATF
and the FBI embedded with our violent crime team so when you look at the FY
2008 it continues to fund all of our core services here at the Lansing Police
Department making sure that our crime-fighting strategies and our
community policing models all are put into place so we can accomplish our
mission and I think it’s always important again that when you know we
have task force and recommendations that we we utilize as a blueprint not only as
a profession nationally but also here at the Lansing Police Department so all
those do come into play in this FY 20 but you real quickly I think when you
look at the the budget when we break that down category by category again
those six pillars of community policing and outreach increasing training and
officer wellness and I will tell you we have increased our training by 200
percent over the last several years we do a lot of on-duty training that is
helping our officers through dis de-escalation crisis intervention mental
illness and again expanding our community policing programs on slide
number 31 when we talk about recruiting and hiring FY 19 we did utilize the
front-loading model and that it does continue here into FY 20 as
to kind of take care of all of our future retirements that are going to
happen in 2020 and of course technology is a basis of a lot of what we do so
lastly in closing I want to thank the men and women of the Lansing Police
Department I want to thank mayor Andy Shore City Council our police board of
commissioners and the citizens of Lansing for your continued support you
know I said it earlier I’m amazed at the work that our police officers do and if
you could ride with them and walk with them and see day to day the the
commitment and the level of service they provide each and every shift you would
be amazed right alongside me so with that said I am available for questions
you may have questions from Council members councilmember Washington
councilmember Garza councilmember fain council member Jackson thank you madam
president Thank You chief for a really nice
presentation I think you all do a wonderful job and you are very
responsive whenever I email text I can’t believe how quickly you get on things so
kudos I just have a couple questions how long how much longer are we in this
partnership with the MSP well they haven’t said any deadlines to us I did
meet with the new kernel obviously they have a new leadership over there as well
but I can tell you I don’t want to speak for all the other secured city
partnerships in the state of Michigan but we have just an absolute wonderful
relationship with the Michigan State Police they have informed us they are
not making any changes here in 2019 and we hope that we can continue that
partnership into the future but I still think you know in fairness to the
colonel he’s got to figure out where he’s gonna go as an agency but again I
would put the city of Lansing up to any of the other 11 cities as far as how
strong our partnership is here it is making a difference I believe it I just
wondered if this was going to be ongoing or if it’s year-to-year or I think
they’re doing a great job yeah so far so good
okay at one time we had consideration for cold cases how are
did did the folks that you bring down boy brought on board make a difference
and solving them yeah we did so we’ve had detective Tracy Jones is currently
our cold-case detective and we use some outside consultants to kind of go
through some of those cases and certainly in today’s day and age when
you look at forensic evidence DNA it’s really adding a whole nother layer I can
tell you we’ve made some some good progress on cases we have been able to
at least come up with what we believe potentially those that are responsible
and now we just got to work through some of our investigations and putting the
evidence together and we’re optimistic that we could see one of those cases
solved here in 2019 as well awesome that’s great news um could you explain
to me what is start sta RT yeah that’s our special tactics in response team
okay a lot of people referred to as a SWAT team it’s a tactical team okay just
a couple more thank you for the cpos I know the neighborhood’s I have them in
they are the number one reason I believe that crime is down I really appreciate
it particularly in Baker Donora in north town and he’s Kalamazoo there’s they
make such a huge difference and you have given us some stellar officers to fill
those spots the other thing is narcan or whatever you call it that’s being funded
right now by grants correct yeah currently right now we have not
spent any you know City dollars on getting naloxone we’ve gotten them
through a couple grants we hope that that will continue we have some other
relationships and certainly with our police social worker if we get to that
point we have another resource that can assist us in getting that in the lock
zone but there’s no doubt about it between L PD and the Lansing fire
department you know naloxone has been pushed over
500 times in the last couple years and what’s the cost of that if we should
lose grants you know it there’s two different models there so there’s the
nasal spray and then there’s this injector the nasal spray is about 25
dollars the injectors are a little more
expensive around 95 dollars a piece so you know we have both but we’ll continue
though I think the grant dollars are going to be there my understanding and
listening to the President’s budget is that there’s going to be a lot of
funding again for the opiate epidemic that we’re faced okay thank you just a
couple more the social worker have you seen a lot of positive from that yeah I
will tell you you know we’re giving her some time to kind of build her resources
her connections but I will tell you we’re very fortunate that the Jan
Bidwell you know she comes with years of experience she’s been working in our
detention facility already so she had a little bit of a groundwork of how we
function but already she’s being deployed out there were sending her to
other areas of the country that have deployed a social worker and and you
know I’m not familiar with anyone else here in the state of Michigan that has a
social worker embedded with the police department I’m not saying that they
don’t but I you know we don’t have a lot of options here in the state of Michigan
but she’s making those contacts she’s building out her resource list she’s
meeting with community mental health with the police officers we’ve gotten
her engaged in a lot of those three categories already okay I appreciate
that i I just kind of wondered how that was working out I’m hoping we’re not
sending her away from the city a whole lot we kind of need our employees right
here no I think you know just like with anything else in order for us to you
know have best practices and lessons learned there’s nothing better than
going out and and seen it hands-on embedding them for a day or two with
another agency but no she’s gone too she’s gonna hit I think two cities that
are doing this and then she’s gonna implement some of those best practices
for us okay good because when they’re not here they’re not working here so
that’s but I get what you’re saying the only other thing I have cheap is the
CPOs it’s my understanding and I don’t mean
this critically that for the past two years our overtime budget has been
burned up like within the first six months which
causes the cpos to have to be called away from their area quite often and
that sometimes it leaves us short is there anything you can say to address
that but one more thing and then you can address them both with the FBI embedded
with us are we doing anything to hit the human trafficking in our area
yep so I’ll hit the first question if I forget the second part please remind me
but I will tell you that you know the the philosophy behind community policing
we know it works so our goal is to try and get our CP oh is a hundred percent
of the time in their neighborhoods you know depending on the day of the week
the time of the year the call loads that are going now you know we know that we
have to pull them off their neighborhoods to address the priority
one calls that are happening you know so we we strive for that a hundred percent
but they’re hitting it about I would call it you know this is a guesstimate
about sixty percent of their shift they’re in their neighborhoods and so
they rearrange their schedules to hit the problems that are going on in their
neighborhoods so I will tell you the over time is not directly related to the
community policing officers when you are running you know with the minimums if
someone calls them six someone gets hurt and it’s not all just the roll patrol
the overtime right it’s our detention unit it is our detectives that come in
and violent crime you know we’ve taken an aggressive approach to utilizing our
resources on all of our non-fatal shootings just like it would be a
homicide because we know that that’s gonna help us keep our city safe those
are the ones that we can really accomplish that mission on so I would
tell you the over time is not necessarily tied to the community
policing officers what we’ve really started doing is embedding our violent
crime initiative with our community policing officers so we kind of use that
as a force multiplier so they can address those issues in their
neighborhood the goal is one hundred percent were about sixty percent right
now okay I just wondered if maybe we needed more officers if we’re burning up
our overtime so quickly the other question I had is we have more sketchy
businesses coming up and I guess I’m wondering what we’re doing to address
the trafficking of young yep so I can tell you with our relationship with the
FBI and it’s not necessarily the one that’s embedded with us but if we have
to you know we utilize whatever resources
we have we have had active investigations we have had convictions
when it comes to human trafficking without getting into the strategics of
what we got going on right now I can tell you that we are addressing those
quality of life issues those life impacting investigations with our youth
not only here in the state of Michigan all over the country you know human
trafficking is still an issue that we got to wrap our hands around and so we
do have resources we do utilize our state and our federal resources but
those are they’re complex and and when they go outside of our city that’s where
our federal partners come into play yep and I can tell you you know on our daily
list of things to do that’s in there and it’s being addressed as we speak uh that
would be councilmember Garza than Huseyin than jackson thank you madam
president nice hey that’s another discussion but
anyways um Jodi answered a couple questions or you answered a couple
questions but as far as the community police officer goes I know we had a
sidebar about a week ago about possibly we might add another one to the north
north town or north side can you speak a little bit on that and and if because my
war war two is the only one that doesn’t have a community community police
officer I know you know this just for everybody else that doesn’t but is there
if we don’t get one to the second Ward is there a possible chance to rotate
them just to see a police presence in my in war two yeah I will tell you you know
every every year we kind of reevaluate where’s where’s the best spot to put our
community policing officers yes we use data we use some historical you know
boundaries where does the officer make the most impact because sometimes you
can put them in an area that it’s just too large you know that we like to
utilize foot patrols bicycle patrols but really a lot of it comes down for calls
for service and crime data and and if it’s a hot area we’ll put a community
policing officer in there and then we’ll remove them and put them someplace else
for example we did that in the Richwood Conrad area Orchard Court area and so
you know where we got to a point where we couldn’t really justify putting a
community policing the officer there based upon the crime levels that were
there they weren’t very high so we redeployed at someplace else but we’re
constantly looking at where is the best spot to put those community policing
officers then as always I’ll work with the mayor’s office to you know to
determine where is the best fit for that Thank You councilmember Hussain and
council member Jackson very much appreciate everything that you do truly
and I would echo the statements made by Council in Washington the responsiveness
is tremendous and I very much appreciate that but that being said I’m trying to
understand your numbers just a little bit better when you look at 203 so you
know we would be moving from 202 funded positions to 203 what is the national
average do you know what the national averages per 1000 residents
here in the city of lansing we’re at about 1.7 for per 1000 residents is
there is there a number out there in terms of the national average yeah this
is this this is where we enter the great debate as to you know how many police
officers is enough for a community so one of the older models breaks it down
just for that per per 1000 if you follow that model it says 2.4 so if you were to
look at Lansing’s population of 117 thousand with with 203 sworn police
officers you know we’re at about that 1.6 to 1.7 range the national average
would be 2 point 4 for that but it really comes down to what does the
community want how many hours of obligated time do you want your police
officers right now our schedule is to try and get at least 30 percent of their
shift to deal with just being a presence or doing proactive policing in a
neighborhood you can go up to as high as 50 percent 60 percent how much time do
you want your police officers how many cases do you want your detectives to
have right so some of our detectives have 40 to 70 cases at one time you know
so it all depends on how many police officers you want to address the issues
if you want to have more community policing officers do you want to
dedicate to say they have those community policing officers are going to
spend 100 percent of their time in their neighborhoods unless there’s a major
issue going on in the city or police officers you know asking for help and
they have to leave their neighborhood assist on that so you know it’s a great
debate in law enforcement but if you use that model it would be 2.4 ok so we’re
gonna use 2.4 we would be at about 278 officers in the city of Lansing which
protract I was 75 short I’ll tell you what I want I want to make sure that the
police department is is staffed appropriately so that we can absolutely
not only probably retire some of the things that councilman Washington
referenced in terms of violent crime human trafficking illegal gambling
establishments but that we can also be proactive and preventative that we’re
actually patrolling our neighborhoods appropriately making sure when we talk
about community policing I think so often we talk about the 10 community
police officers but it would be fantastic if all of our police officers
had the liberty to to engage the community in the way
that we know they need to be and so you know in just anecdotally one of the
number-one concerns we hear about when we go to neighborhood watch meetings the
neighborhood association meetings is the speeding in the fact that you know our
Traffic Division is is in my opinion incredibly understaffed and under
resource in in there really putting out fires all across the city and to be
quite frank a lot of those fires they’re putting out you know I’m conveying them
to you and you’re obviously going down the ladder in order to get them out
there but they’re really moving you know from one part of the city to another but
they’re they’re really addressing issues that are widespread although they might
be it’s almost a complaint based I mean these issues are widespread you know
throughout throughout our community so I really want to see you guys
staffed appropriately what would happen in terms of understanding the numbers
could you tell me if you back out command if you back out school resource
officers if you back out special operations if you back out how many
officers do we actually have that are patrolling the streets of Lansing well
we have approximately give or take 96 that are assigned to our Road patrol for
the sector’s and I would I would tell you you know it comes down to what can
the city afford you know I don’t think anyone would argue that hey if we could
add more police officers we’d all love to do that I’ve had many conversations
with the mayor and others throughout the city it’s what can we afford right and
so when you look at when you look at the breakdown of where our police officers
are there are certain aspects that we have a responsibility for like subpoenas
being delivered if subpoenas don’t get to the witnesses
and the victims and the cases don’t get judicata in the courts we don’t get
conviction so one of those roles is we got to serve subpoenas right when you
look at the school resource officers if you know the number of calls for service
that we we we have at our three high schools when we don’t have our school
resource officer there we’re pulling people off the road that’s going into
the schools they’re not connected you know there’s where your community
policing and the schools are you know they have that connection with them
already so you know when you start breaking down like
violent crime impacting if we did not we’ve tried it without the violent crime
impact team and again you’re not having an effective strategy to focus on those
individuals are you know committing the crimes you know it’s no it’s no
different in Lansing than it is all over the country and about five percent of
our populations responsible for 80% 90% of our crime so to be able to focus on
those are committing the crime so if you pull one person from one unit to another
you know you’re taking away those responsibilities that were tasked with
and so you know what’s the magic number you know we’ve done resource studies and
allocation studies you know in whether you’re on a test ends or 12s we’ve done
the 12 officer model you know fatigue comes into play and I don’t think it’s a
good idea to put our police officers in 12-hour shifts will that get you a few
more bodies on the road yeah but they’re not engaged in our community policing
model at least that’s been our experience well I think you asked a good
question so when we talk about what can we afford that’s exactly what I think
this council was trying to determine so when we look through the budget and you
know obviously from 2006 to 2016 we had you know sixty million dollars cut from
the general fund budget and of course the police department did not go
unscathed and so my understanding is that at the peak you know we had some
three hundred and two officers we’re down to 202 so as we start to see these
three point nine and four percent increases into the general fund in terms
of revenue I think it’s imperative that every single dollar is found a critical
service or a critical position and as I look through this budget I’m not certain
that’s happening I would have loved to see maybe three to four officers added
this year we can’t obviously do it in one fell swoop but again I think it is
our responsibility when you look at a community that can retain residents that
can attract residents can you know retain and attract businesses Public
Safety is at the very top of the heap you look at Public Safety you look at
infrastructure you look at parks you look at public services you look at but
for me Public Safety is always going to be right up at the top and I know for a
fact you know I interface with your officers and neighborhood watch meetings
and association meetings just about every night of the week they absolutely
in my opinion are do the absolute best job they can I think
we have some of the best nations around officers in the nation but I do think
they’re understaffed at this point I listen to the scanner it’s it’s called
saturation almost always we you know there’s mutual aid requests all the time
and so I really would like to see us start to build back capacity within the
police department but I do appreciate your comments just one I actually had a
bunch but I’m not going to ask every question I do have a question pertaining
to pal and I cannot remember the regards to the midnight basketball program last
year I can’t remember whose budget that was a part of but I am wondering if that
program has went away if we’re not budgeting for that any longer my
understanding is that was supposed to run from mid-june to August 25th it was
supposed to run every Friday Saturday the the purpose of that I thought that
program was was similar to what we’re trying to accomplish with that particular program interestingly how the
program did that’s something we’ve struggled with in terms of metrics and
measuring some of these programs so we actually have some of the work that Andy
Crawford is doing we have a Harvard fellow coming this summer paid for by
Bloomberg philanthropies to look at our youth services and the impact of whether
or not they’re working or whether we should invest more significantly in them
or you know change around how we’re doing them and so we’re gonna be have
someone that’s coming into town for free for us from Harvard to measure all these
programs and look at the impact Samantha does that mean that that’s in the
mayor’s budget correct yeah all right so when we get to the mayor’s budget I
would just said that you know we did get successfully got a public well we got a
grant it’s the psn project safe neighborhood budget and so it wasn’t
always about convictions it’s also about giving back in the community policing
model again so we did get a grant and we’re gonna be assisting in that
midnight program but I would say that Powell is designed for the little bit of
the younger kids where the midnight basketball was for our our young adults
if you will okay we have council member Jackson then
council member spits Lee thank you good evening as critical as I may sound
sometimes you know all indications point that you’re doing a great job and same
with the whole department so I appreciate that I just have a few areas
I’ll start with the easy one homicide clearance rate is that arrest or
conviction it is arrest so but I will tell you I
you know off the top of my head just about every single arrest that we’ve had
we’ve had convictions on you know there was a there was one case I think it was
in 2017 we made an arrest got dropped pending further investigation reissued
about six months after that but I will tell you that you know we take great
pride in that and we want to make sure that we get it right the first time and
making sure that we bring justice to the families but those those are arrests but
I will tell you without 100% the stats in front of me
most of those are convictions as well thank you for personnel are there
vacancies because I heard you say something about best practice hiring
that we go around and show other people do and we’re front-loading are there
vacancies technically there’s not any vacancies as we speak right now we’re
actually front loaded with the understanding that they are currently in
the police academy they’re slated to graduate here on May 3rd and so they
will be getting we are slated to get a minimum of 13 that will be starting on
May 6 and then we have another handful that we’re going to be starting shortly
after that so in in June if you will we’ll have about 24 people in our field
training program and we will be front loaded up till July 1st as of today we
will have plus 5 come July 5th great there’s a lot of talk about community
policing and you know we all have the picture of the officer on the bike
talking to kids you know maybe informally working out things that can
be but then you mentioned that you and the VCI with them is that like a
practice that’s widespread or I guess where is the decision because it just
seems when I don’t know maybe can you explain that a little better yeah you
know I I think you know you hear the term suppression units right or you hear
you know a violent crime impact team I think what’s unique about the lansing
model is that they’ll go they’ll spend their time with shop with a cop they
will go out on our community events a national night out they will do things
that aren’t about tracking down the most violent offenders so you know i
they bring a community policing model let me just say is that listen even
though your you might be assigned as a community policing officer that is a
philosophy embedded throughout the organization is to treat people with
dignity and respect acts of kindness the number of times
that our officers have bought meals clothes basketballs
basketball hoops i mean the list goes on and on and on that’s just because your
sign and community policing officer doesn’t mean that those philosophies are
being you know demonstrated throughout their their days so forfeiture i know
there’s some line items and I know that you explained a little better but is
there just help me understand is there any place in Lansing’s budget that we
have discretion over where we have an earmark forfeiture well I will tell you
that some of our operating budget we can’t use forfeiture for the cost the
personnel cost but we can use it to help operate so heating cooling vehicles
equipment buy money but I will tell you we are at that point more than likely
we’ve started to have those conversations where I’m not sure that
forfeiture is going to you know we’re running down to that point where general
fund dollars are probably going to be needed to fund our special operations
section potentially even as early as next fiscal year okay and I guess if we
can really quickly turn the page 19 41 there’s this Illini tum’ forfeiture
Co – co-op ICC where it has the 2018 actuaries actuals is 38,000 and then he
budgets up and now it’s you know I just wonder what’s the big difference in over
a couple years well really it comes down to cases so we had we had a particular
good drug investigation that netted I want to say three hundred and seventy
five thousand dollars this was a you know a large-scale major heroin cocaine
dealer that was coming through the city of Lansing through other parts of
Michigan and outside of Michigan so as a result of that investigation we got
about three hundred seventy-five thousand dollars out of that
investigation okay but each year you don’t say how much no we don’t and and I
think you know it’s important to point out again is that the the police
department is not in the business of generating revenue right our job is to
keep our community safe and you know there are some tools right there are
some tools there that have been proven to be effective against drug
organizations but again we are not in the business of going on a drug raid and
taking 50 items out of the house and and you know putting them up for auction our
job is to hold those responsible and to stop the action so again we are not in
the business of generating revenue again I think those those forfeiture dollars
you know we’re gonna be in the general fund dollars unless we get that rare
case where you get three hundred and seventy five thousand dollars but now
the rules have changed right so you might not even see that unless you get a
conviction sure so last area you mentioned like
technology it’s a lot of what we do it’s everywhere there’s so many different
applications and programs I guess how is that
decided on well yeah you know a lot of times it’ll it’ll start you know from
the organization will present that to the IT director into the mayor’s office
and say hey we we believe that this will increase our effectiveness and
efficiencies whatever that that you know technology might be for example
body-worn cameras right so we believe that that was going to accomplish
several missions and that was to help us with prosecution of cases that it would
be an accurate depiction potentially of what happened on a call for service for
complaints and to also allow us for training purposes is that you know if
you’ve ever played a sport right and you videotape your practices in the game and
you spend the whole next day spending hours going over that film we do the
same thing how can we get better and we show that to the officers so you know
technology gets vetted at a lot of different ways but technology can be
your best friend and your worst enemy at the same time but we do believe that
technology is a force multiplier for us and that’s exactly what that real-time
crime Center is all about is to get you know all those those pieces into the
police officers hand in a timely manner I guess it’s my last follow-up so you
mentioned like the app the application we presented to the mayor or the IT but
wouldn’t it be for you since you’re the you know law enforcement chief well I
think you know I think everyone has a role in that right is that you know I
might have a great idea and I might go to the the IT director and say hey we
want to implement this and they say well listen that’s a duplication or you know
our system doesn’t support that or we have some cyber security concerns with
that then I might take it to the mayor’s office and they might have something
similar in the works or you know a funding source that it gets you know
either accelerate or delayed to another another fiscal year but I think it’s a
team effort you know my job is to present you know I feel to be you know
good ideas to make this organization and they keep this city safe
and I think you have to consult with both IT in the mayor’s office and
Finance obviously you know there’s a lot of things that we want every year that
doesn’t get on the budget because there’s only so many resources to go
around all right before I call councilmember spits Lee
and councilmember Dunbar isn’t also chief one of the ways in dealing with
technology the fact that there are different applications that are required
because of your interaction with the state the courts the county so some of
those are predicated on the fact that in order to talk to or to be online with
different ones you have to go along with some of their IT requirements as well is
that correct yeah it is correct I mean obviously for example lean right that’s
a state system that every Police Department in the state of Michigan has
to utilize so you have to be lien compliant and sometimes you know other
programs just don’t don’t don’t blend well with that you know we’re getting
ready for the counties getting ready for another radio project so you know we
have to make sure that we’re we have interoperability with our own systems
and new CAD systems that we can’t control all the time council members
physically then councilmember Dunbar thank you madam president I will add my
appreciation chief for your officers I you know I I appreciate when you’re out
at various festivals or kids events there’s always somebody out there on a
you know on a bike or whatever interacting and I think that that’s the
best way to you know kind of reduce the stigma of of police officers but also
you know you embed ourselves in the community and and be community partners
I have a I have just a couple questions so when you say technically there are no
vacancies that gets back to best practices right I mean you know for a
city this size and I think I asked the same question last year for a city this
size you know is there a number of officers that should be out and about on
this streets yet so kind of back to
councilmember Hussein’s question is that there’s a couple different philosophies
on you know how many police officers are needed if you utilize that that per
thousand then it would say that that we need to have two point four police
officers for that so then you’re into that two hundred and sixty range it all
depends on what can you afford and what do you want your police
officers focusing their time on right you know if you want your community
policing officers to spend a hundred percent of the time then we know that
two hundred and two they’re not spending 100 percent of time their neighborhood
so you know again it comes down to what kind of what kind of deliveries do you
want from your Police Department what kind of performance measurements and so
if you utilize that per thousand which the experts will tell you you can’t rely
on that one hundred percent it’s two point four we’re at one point seven and
I appreciate the number and I also appreciate how diplomatic you are in in
in talking about it I do think the 260 is probably the number I was thinking of
her I had a mind of um I want to ask you a question about the pal in the midnight
basketball I guess it I think it’s probably more of a question for Sam I
mean that’s so that has that whole program been moved over to Bishop
Maxwell is that what I’m understanding okay well and Pal is now under or is
that still pals always been with the police department just been a little
dormant we you know we’re just trying to re-energize we’re looking at clinics
we’re looking at one day camps you know engaging with some of our other
community partners that are doing similar type of things like the Boys and
Girls Club yeah all right and then I think my final question is you know with
with the invention of body cameras I can imagine that your FOIA requests are just
ridiculous and so how is that going what’s in
how are you managing that I guess is the bigger question of all of those requests
and and what’s your turnaround time yeah I’m the average so it’s again there’s
not a great answer for this one other than there’s a lot of requests that come
in because you have discovery requests you have FOIA requests and we have a
staff of five so we have four police techs and then we have a supervisor that
oversees our freedom of information and we work very closely with the City
Attorney’s Office as well you know depending on what the request is where
we’re seeing our greatest struggles or challenges I should say is the video
portion of it and so you know at times those will still be delayed about 30
days it’s still taking us about 30 days to turn that video around Discovery’s
got to go you know first to the prosecutor’s office whether it’s
redacted or not redacted and then the City Attorney’s Office you know they
have their own request for video as well so you know I think it’s it’s just like
we knew this would be one of our challenges when we went to the body worn
cameras but it’s not just body worn cameras it’s any video right a public
safety video any videos we get through investigations cell phone stuff
everything needs a search warrant it just takes a lot more time so to answer
your question we’re about 30 days on video right and what’s the I mean can
you give me an average cost of that whole I mean is the average cost
increase is it can you can you give me that number since you started this whole
program from you know the body cameras to now can you give me kind of a general
cost of how much it’s cost the police department to process and you know
fulfill these and then finally my statement is I really appreciate your
efforts on diversity I think that you can be a model for success I think
you’ve gone above and beyond trying to you know attract diverse and qualified
candidates I’m always saying you know qualified candidates are the first thing
but the fact that you’ve you know you’ve also made diversity a priority is
greatly appreciated so then back to the yeah I’ll um I’ll
give you I’ll give you some quick stats on the hiring and then I’ll go back to
your other question so in 2016 of all the police officers that we hired we
were at a forty percent minority female rate a 2017 57 percent 2018 60 percent
in so far in 2019 eighty percent of our hires are either a minority or female
and so you know again we we want the best and the brightest but it’s also you
know I got to give it a lot of credit to our staff lieutenant craft sergeant
Jason’s Palma and everyone in our department that is going out and seeking
you know qualified candidates and I think if they feel welcomed here in the
city of Lansing first and foremost they feel welcomed at the Lansing Police
Department those numbers are just going to continue to increase for us and so
we’re making great progress but it is still one of our greatest challenges we
spend a lot of time and effort in resources but you said the key word is
they feel welcome right and so you know with then that’s what we’re hearing
whereas maybe in some other departments are having some issues with that but you
you know they feel welcome and that they’re a welcomed addition and that
that’s the most important part family family atmosphere is what we strive for
and then if you could get two counts my birth well to all of us if you could get
a breakdown on the cost of that the question that yes in Sochi is the
question more related to the FOIA or just what do we spend in a year on our
body worn camera program right yeah I know you’ve had to hire additional
staff I know that but you know in addition to the staffing in the
processing and the reaction and so I wish I’m just yeah in the storage I’m
just curious how much more of a burden that is on your budget sure I will get
you some some better numbers but I would tell you you know on the average it
takes us about four to five hours to process one hour of video the numbers
yeah keep going up drastically each and every year but I’ll get you those exact
numbers I don’t have them in front of me right now thank you councilmember Dunbar
thank you very much I just quickly pulled up some stats and I appreciate
you mentioning that the the numbers have to be analyzed
because what I’m finding and and you can correct me if I’m wrong one of the
reasons that they might not be reliable is that it skews disproportionately in
favor of higher ratios in communities that are under fifty thousand people
particularly under ten thousand people and we have far more rural areas and
small communities across the country with police departments than we do major
cities so based on that I just looked up the UC our staffing statistics and right
now the total in the Midwest and this is in this matters by region the total for
a community our size which is a hundred to two hundred and fifty thousand is one
point eight per thousand in the Midwest on average it’s one point seven in the
West it’s one point two Pacific one point five Mountain one point five
northeast two point six southeast two point two you can go through a lot of
different areas with this and then if you get under ten thousand which is
where the it’s skews you can have it as high as five point nine per thousand two
point eight three point seven so I just I wanted to point that out that it’s not
just the number it’s not just the average across the country it actually says here
in the FBI statistics that to get an accurate account you should use a median
not an average and to get closer to your own community you’ve got to kind of skew
out the under 50,000 and right now the if you eliminate cities under 50,000 in
so you only consider cities of at least 50,000 the average across and this is
not even median this is averages one point six six so we’re pretty on par
with that I’m not saying we shouldn’t have more officers I’m just saying that
I don’t want anybody out there to think that we are drastically understaffed
because the national averages and the national media improved differently I
think that’s exactly why they say you can’t really rely on that formula you
know because you can look at the South compared to the Midwest to the north
some have unions some don’t have unions you know Michigan’s lost 4,000 police
officers the Midwest has been hit hard because of the auto industry you know so
there is again it comes down to each community what can you afford what kind
of police services do you want alright I have a few questions then comes my
versus sane and then we’ll wrap this up and get on to our next department my
first question has to do with the increase of a community police officer
can you tell me what that cost is for a community police officer to have them on
the street yeah so you know when we broke this down I want to say it was
somewhere around a hundred and two thousand was the number that it was for
year one okay and does that and that obviously includes benefits but does it
include the car the includes everything with the car everything about the car
okay what is the contract positions for the level the graduate level crime
analysts what are you looking at as far as that cost yep so I want to if I
remember correctly he’s about $50,000 set aside 20 thousand per
in turn and then some equipment costs like a computer or some licensing so
it’s fifty thousand dollars for two all right and then for the PAL program that
we’ve been talking about you said there was a small amount in there what are you
talking about ten thousand dollars we were fortunate to have some donations
and you know if you remember years ago Carroll that we had a lot of citizens
yes thank you support pal program you know a lot more cops to run it but you
know you know it’s it’s gonna be run on some general fund dollars but also
donations as well okay then the relocation of the special
operations sectioned I know that there were some concerns and I’m going back
all the way to when we were North and South Precinct about having special
operations near where the public was coming in and out because we are talking
special operations looking at the idea of giving it having it over at the ops
building what are you looking at as far as security and things like that to make
sure that we’re not having situations that could compromise special operations
yeah you know obviously we’ve we’ve put in a lot of great thought into this and
I think at the end of the day the pros outweigh the cons and so without getting
into specifics as to what we’re going to do to kind of you know protect us here
at those absolutely we are aware of those concerns and and certainly you
know we’re gonna have to do things a little bit differently to ensure that
their safety and and that they’re protected their identities protected but
we believe again that the pros outweigh the cons and in the efficiencies in
effective I’m not saying that it doesn’t right now we’re paying 125 thousand
dollars to the school district will that increase by having special operations
here well would be utilizing more space we will not be it’s the same space we’re
just readjusting a few of our areas but will not be spending more money based on
the space you know if we utilize or electricity then you know that will
be prorated but it will not be for more space how much longer do we have on the
lease with school district well currently we’re renegotiating the
contract with the school district hopefully it’ll be lower well you know
in the spirit of confidentiality in contract negotiations OCA the mayor’s
office is working with the school district on that as we speak
okay well I’m pushing for lower I want to talk about the in-car computer
replacements and whether you can answer this or whether it comes financed is
this coming out of your budget under the Capitol CIP or is that coming out of
technology it is coming out of the Technology Fund the IT fund yes okay
thank you and then the increase that you’re
talking about with the salaries is that based on the fact that the you’ve got a
contract coming up is that part of some money that’s been built in for contract
negotiations I’m gonna let Angie answer that but you know the current wages are
for what the contract is if it wasn’t to change I know that when Angie puts
together you know when contract talks are come and she handles that a little
bit differently but Angie if you want to answer how you appropriate those funds
so the budget as it is proposed reflects what is known at this time which does
not have those because those contracted negotiations have not begun there is a
council policy though that we hope would be react with this with this upcoming
budget that allows for transfers in when we have a settlement of a contract so
then those wages that are we currently have how many people from
the State Police working with us at the city we have eight state troopers three
are detectives and the other five are troopers in uniform has there been any
thought and I know this was discussed a little bit earlier but looking at the
fact that again this is on the good graces of State Police and the governor
that have tomorrow that they had to move they were taken away about integrating
and looking at bringing people increase in in your request for employees have
you I mean the amount of work that they’re doing is obvious because they’re
here so what what type of a planning are you looking at with this yeah well I
think just like with with everything that we do is that you know we try and
get as many resources as possible and if the Michigan State Police secured city
partnership was to go away certainly we had some further discussions with with
the mayor and his staff as to you know what that with that you know effect will
be on the day-to-day operations and the violent crime impact team but you know
when you talk about resources you know I there isn’t a chief or a sheriff in this
country that wouldn’t say they want more police officers but you got to utilize
them the right way just having you know 60 more police officers we don’t utilize
in the right way and that’s ineffective to police presence you know the research
and studies will tell you the presence of a police officer even if they’re
walking through a neighborhood will make a difference he talked about the front
loading of police officers but with the current contract coming up we do have
the potential of 20 police officers that could retire with this contract so then
we would be looking at only four that you would have from the numbers that you
gave us just a little bit ago looking at front-loading
like I can tell you when when I provide you these numbers we’ve been working
very closely with those officers those employees that are within their to two
years of retirement and so we have a pretty good feel for those that are
still pondering whether they’re going to leave early or not I wouldn’t say that
it’s 20 unless something drastically changes but a lot of those front loads
are for for FY 2021 already guys so we’ve taken that consideration where we
have another five that are going through background that we would send to the
August Academy so we’re already working towards that and that’s why we’ve been
very fortunate for the support from the mayor’s office to give us that ability
to front-load those positions to kind of anticipate those that are leaving in
2020 as well but we’ve taken that consideration yes there might be a
little bit of an increase but that number I don’t think anyone knows until
contract negotiations start well someone that has been advocating for
front-loading going back to chief Boles it has been something I’ve believed that
has been extremely important and helps in the integration of of the department
Councilmember Hussein and then we will bring this to an end
yeah just very quickly I wanted to say that I appreciate it Councilwoman
Dunbar’s data I think that absolutely doesn’t that tell the whole story and
that’s why I made it a practice of mine in my three years and some change on
city council and I know Councilwoman Dunbar does the same in terms of
engaging frontline workers I think it’s incredibly important that we are talking
to our frontline workers each and every day as much as that value command you
know in terms of the people that are in the trenches whether it be a cold office
or a premise inspector a police officer a firefighter in asking them what do
they actually need and I will tell you on condition of anonymity every single
police officer that I talked to says we need more bodies period we are really
really really struggling to do our job the way we know that this community
deserves because we just simply don’t have the numbers so I think that’s an
incredibly important I too AM worried we have no control and when we talk about
the a state troopers that are embedded within our department I know five
actually even respond to calls for service for instance
as well as the ATF and the FBI we have no control over whether or not that
funding continues and whether or not our community continues to be prioritized so
as early as next year we could see an extraction of all of that personnel and
if that was to happen I think it would be crippling for our department so I
think we always need to also keep that in mind I did have a quick question I
was shaking my head as if I knew what you were talking about but I had no idea
and still have no idea what a firing range decelerator trap is did you tell
me what that yeah it’s it’s basically at the end of the range where the bullets
get deflected and they they get put down into a trap they got to be cleaned out
just the wear and tear since 1998 there there beyond the point of repair so
we’ve done some minor repairs to them but now they actually have to be
replaced so you know as the the bullets go downrange
they get trapped into this what they call a decelerator we have one final
question and if we look on page 4 of 9 under charges for service for public
safety we have police accidents reports and they were budgeted for $15,000 this
current budget year the year and projection is 300,000 and we’re
budgeting 300,000 for next year can somebody give me an idea as to what that
increase has to do with I understand our roads are bad but I don’t think they
were quite that bad I cannot 100% answer that question other than I believe it
could be a typo to 30,000 instead of 300,000 but I will certainly sit down
with Angie and we’ll we’ll figure out if that’s a typo or not all right thank you
thank you very much chief and we appreciate the work that you and the men
and women of the Lansing Police Department do each and every day thank
you thank you for your continued support appreciate it you’re welcome and that
takes us joan jackson johnson with human relations and community service joan if
you could please come to the front and you can take over the
Chiefs see do you have some material you’d like
Angie to pass out for you good after it’s your green light on on the mic okay
okay sorry about that that’s all right saying that the staff
works really hard and we partner with a number of other city departments
including LPD lfd and a number of others HR CS engages in a complex system with
Housing and Urban Development Michigan State Housing Development Authority area
agencies and community members to invest in the enhancement of human
effectiveness in our community it is a complex system with uncertainties
multiple stakeholders and inherent unpredictability yet we work tirelessly
to our best practices to strengthen empower and educate the most vulnerable
in our community fighting poverty is at the core of the basic mission of HR CS
the department is collaborating with a nationally renowned poverty solution
expert dr. Marcella Wilson who is a CEO and founder of transition to success a
model of fighting poverty and drive self-sufficiency and author of diagnosis
poverty a new approach for understanding and treating an epidemic and other local
organizations to develop and organized approach to reduce poverty in our city
when you look at the numbers the poverty rate in Lansing is twenty-seven point
one which means that one out of every three point seven residents in Lansing
is in poverty the rate across the state is fifteen point six meaning Lansing
has a dramatic higher than average percentage of residents below the
poverty line when compared to the rest of Michigan we look at a needs gap and
prioritize priorities for budget each year
HR SCS host a community forum inviting agencies organizations and community
members to discuss and identify challenges in the community there
revelant to a healthy environment and cost-effective solutions the return on
the city’s 1.25 percent of the budget is estimated to be 10 times that funding
although the investment and to each program is relatively a small fraction
it influences the overall commitment of human service investment in the
community unlike other departments HR FCS competes
for federal state and no income housing funding for our area which this year was
projected over three million dollars HUD with a little over 2.5 million
Michigan State Housing Development 453 thousand which rounded up is about 3
million out of that we receive over two hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars
to manage and report on these and we have to utilize the federal homeless
information management system that really tracks all of the people
receiving services through this department we the mission of our
department is to foster well function in a connected community through
coordination of Human Services dispute mediation reconciliation services
complaint investigation grant development and implement federal state
and local mandates last year we did our community forum and made decisions with
that based on the distribution of one point six hundred sixty thousand dollars
to more than 90 human service agencies to address basic
need at least again ten times that comes back in the community through an
estimated 16 million 120,000 in leveraged dollars both state and federal
HR oversaw three million 123 thousand plus and federal and state grant to
address homelessness at-risk individuals including the 230 plus thousand dollars
in administrative system and our hrs the homeless information management system
HR CSX as a collaborative applicant for our HUD
dollars for the local continuum of care interagency planning body provides grant
applications and strategic planning expertise this past year we receive
Housing Choice vouchers in the number of five hundred and thirty which is Lansing
Housing Commission but the majority well not Lansing Housing Commission with that
all of these were from the state our problem has been finding landlords that
will work with us that would receive those subsidies and as a result of that
you know Joe McDonald in our office works really hard to do the landlord
rental program it has helped in some ways but we are fighting not to lose any
of those vouchers because of varying the ability to place people we can utilize
the Greater Lansing area which would include Lansing and all of the
surrounding areas I’m the other thing that we are challenged with is the
volume of referrals we thousands in a year and a lot of those we are plugging
individuals with resources around evictions and we have a program that we
work specifically with Lansing Housing Commission on someone is paying $10 a
month for rent and they’re going to be evicted we have a failed system we have
to work with them we have to help people to maintain that and one of the things
that we do is if you got a dollar from us we make you participate in the
financial empowerment program which again is the education and empowerment
if people don’t do they can’t come back knocking on the
door again another bigger piece is utility assistance we worked with the
state we work with BWL and st. Vincent’s a poll we have people that I think build
that into their budgets for the year yeah beautilities bills right now are
ranging from you know seven eight hundred dollars to five or six thousand
dollars which means that people just not being BWL there’s a good partner
Salvation Army is another one that has had some money through the state to do
that with and we also use true north and then the there’s another program out of
Jackson that we also partner with and so we aren’t doing our job when we’re
having the repetition and that’s the importance of the financial empowerment
program that we continue to and have to really work hard at utilizing food
security is another issue in our community and this past year we
distributed over five hundred tons of food to six thousand seven hundred
eighty-five households in addition to that we do a gap feeding program when
our children are out at school and we know that they are missing the ten free
meals week at school then we did a study several years ago that when kids were in
school they were going home they still were missing 8.2 meals which meant that
in many cases they weren’t going home you know to what was needed
so with this gap feeding program we started out initially with sack lunches
it realized that the whole family was trying to eat out of that so we worked
with my ears st. Vincent’s of power and value land to
help with that Myers gives us money and they also will collect weeks of
discounts to help families and with those we still have the Greater Lansing
Food Bank to bring food there too so that we can really increase what we’re
doing for families our two big annual events a year the connect for kids is
one of the biggest programs last year we served over 5,000 kids at that program
and get a lot of you know financial support from Jackson national just you
know just everyone around the corner Kelly Dean etc and then our Community
Connect which we’re doing with the adults and we
participate with Holycross aka VOA with the veterans program and the mayor will
have some great news to announce very soon in reference to our veterans number
in the community I mentioned Jo’s eviction prevention
program about working with landlords but with the eviction prevention people who
again are at risk with landlords we’re providing some mediation services and
hopes that we can salvage you know some of those contracts so that people don’t
come back through our system as homeless it cost us so much more to allow people
to become homeless than it does to try to work with the landlord and the state
to keep them housed the lack of stability for the kids is certainly
another huge issue when they’re bouncing from here to there unfortunately with a
HUD definition if I become homeless and I move in with my sister I’m not
homeless and I’m not eligible for services our motel program which is
housed at Holy Cross but paid for primarily by the state we paid $28,000
for the position we were second two years in a row with the utilization of
hotel dollars compared to Detroit was first and so we have been working with
homeless angels and some of the others with Burke work that’s not in the city
of Lansing but they do house some people is it ideal for us no we don’t want
people you know sleeping out in the elements and so one of the things we do
with regularity and John I just need a clarification you said second in the
nation you know second in the state I apologize okay
Detroit is number one Lansing was number two like I was starting handing I would
panic on that one too yes yes that is that I mean what I’m just curious we’re
a second in the state why do you think well to start with we last year we had
about five thousand sixty nine roughly homeless individuals and and the city we
have about three hundred beds available for homeless
now the city rescue mission has bailed us out with people who were living out
in the element and opened the outreach program and we were struggling with that
they went from zero to over 60 it was licensed for less so we worked really
hard to get those numbers down and so they had them sleeping on the floor with
just a blanket when they moved from blankets to chair because people were
getting a little too close then those numbers dropped and some people went
back to the shelters but we still struggle when the weather is like this
with a number of people that are outside sleeping in the element so it all has to
do with bed space being availability and the state has requested that we requests
or require the agencies that we work with to at least a lot of people to be
there for 30 days so when you block that 30 days I mean you just don’t have
enough beds here in the city of Lansing it’s the bottom line thank you okay
the Greater Lansing homeless and or report is what we’re talking about with
those numbers and a bit availability and I can get the specifics of those in
terms of what loaves & Fishes has eaves our domestic violence is the only one we
can’t give you the specific data with they don’t allow us to count that in
that system we also through our EEO review 21 construction projects for
prevailing wages resulting in two contractors giving restitution of more
than three thousand dollars to employees coming up again is this week we have
three weeks with the diagnosis poverty training we also have a program called
feed the babies keep them dry that’s maybe eleventh at Lansing Catholic we’re
trying to reduce the number of children that are at extreme risks and some who
have died because of not having formula and other things we push go green not as
in Michigan State but cloth diapers because many families can’t afford
pampers and when you see babies at shelters sometimes the pamper ways know
that more than the babies and many of them are taking the solid mass out and
reusing that and that’s just you know you see some horrible diaper rashes
again what we try to do through feedback from the community is to identify the
challenges that we face and the gaps and one of the
things you guys talked about a lot was youth programming last year we worked
with Parks and Rec and bought in programs at to Lansing housing community
sites and we had a huge gap on the northwest side of Lansing with Cristo
Rey the Krishna raise program just did not work and we are looking really hard
to try to identify someone over there we went with one of the churches they moved
on the south side and we won’t fund them because that’s not where we need program
we have to identify positive resources over on the northwest side of Lansing
you know we fund programs like Boys and Girls Club we’re going to do something
in public housing this year we will pay a stipend to young kids working with
seniors on gardening rather than having them run by and pull up their plants we
want them to weed and work with them and the Housing Authority will help us with
that we also have a new program that I have Renee Freeman working with and
that’s going and teaching how to maintain housing I mean some of the
public housing residents either don’t know how to clean don’t clean I don’t
have the resources to do that so we’re trying to increase and improve the
quality of life of residents there so the director Doug Fleming is working
with us on that as well we also have the financial empowerment program going
there and working on any issues to provide stability and again improve the
quality of life but youth programming is something we definitely need to work
harder on and to make sure that they’re positive outlets in particular during
the summer for the negative energy that a lot of these kids have we get a lot of
donations from GM really nice bikes and stuff like that that we sometimes pass
on to the police officers to give out I was getting ready to get rid of we have
some Detroit bikes until I found out how much they cost and I don’t want parents
to you know sell those and so we’re trying to find a way of selling those
and putting those resources there one of the other youth programs that we’ve kind
of struggle with is eye tech we had them going out to public housing and the
consistency just isn’t there they cut there we are cutting their
grant this year but we want more Louis Bader goes out there through the
literacy program and has MSU students working with families and we have reach
art studio going to several of the public housings as well we have to get
resources there and have to really give kids something to dream for any
questions okay thank you John our first just councilmember spits
lead and vice-president Spadafore thank you madam president
um I really appreciate what you do I know it’s Herculean task and I just
wanted to say thank you um one of the things we had heard earlier from the
neighborhood and and from Andy Crawford’s was that they have a special
project I think it’s called lift up okay um but
it’s and maybe that’s not the correct name no it’s rent smart but it’s one of
those were they’re they’re they’re also helping people with with rent and yeah
and so I want to make sure that there’s not a duplication of effort that’s going
on yeah I only went smart I’m aware of this with Joe McDonald and he has three
classes right once a month and he doesn’t provide he provide education
right programs and working with the landlords but there’s no dollars that
are exchanged there we worked with DHHS and st. the pre she ate that I know I’m
old but I’m pretty sure but I’m pretty sure that we had a discussion because I
specifically asked a question were they coordinating with you and so I
I need to I never pulled that yeah I’m not aware of that but I do know that we
she’s over financial empowerment know I know I knew that
I’m sorry council members if I’m like off the mark
okay so I’m just wondering like I said I’m always concerned about duplication
of efforts so I’m gonna figure out what that program is create now yeah I know
that that Andy Crawford said she doesn’t rent smart program this it’s on your
it’s on her PowerPoint I pulled up her powerpoint on page
it’s on Andy’s powerpoint it is page 7 I think that’s through the office of
financial empowerment honestly I would have to double-check I don’t know that’s
through our department financial empowerment provides us financial
education yeah we’re doing and Velma Kaiser is with at all those programs what our question would be from
councilmembers fitzlee is what is the program do is it
something different than what is happening an HR CS with Joe McDonald and
if it isn’t then why are they not working together because yep I thought
it was I thought that’s what she said and so if that’s the case my question to
her was are you working with your office cuz I know your office is you know that
you guys do it specifically yeah and we do work with Velma who’s over the rent
over the financial empowerment but otherwise no yeah okay vice-president
Spadafore sure Joan again echo the sentiments of councilmember Spitzley they
just really appreciate the work that your department does and so many
agencies you work with I do have a couple questions regarding the lessee
Lansing’s Human Rights Ordinance as it pertains to the provision of services
and contracts that your department signs do all agencies that receive funds from
the city have to conform to our Human Rights Ordinance yes so I have a
question then recently April 16th st. Vincent’s T’Pol or st. Vincent’s
Catholic Charities has sued the state for the privilege to continue to
discriminate against LGBT couples related to adoption services how does
that comport with our Human Rights Ordinance in there forty five to ninety
thousand not a contract st. Vincent Catholic Charities does not receive any
dollars from us we drop their program some of the names on here don’t reflect
the changes we’ve worked with st. Vincent’s to Paul on South Washington we
discontinued our contracts several years ago the federal dollars at st. Vincent’s
Catholic Charities received because they felt we needed to give them more money
to cover their administrative over cost so anything that you can’t we have on
here the st. Vincent’s would be furniture rent and utilities that st.
Vincent’s appalled on South washing and thrift store okay there’s two on here
there it’s several that they receive maybe Angie can help clarify h2 on page
two of three there’s to st. Vincent’s listings one one is for our mobile food
pantry the other one is for utilities which we’re going to change because we
don’t need as much of a I guess we did reduce that here but those are the two
and it has nothing to do with st. Vincent’s Catholic Charities period so I
see another line item for the mobile food pantry of forty thousand and let’s
do that that one goes to the Greater Lansing Food Bank is there maybe a more
updated version of this we might be we we struggle sometimes with name changes
and so maybe Angie can help us to update the list here with the accurate names on
here your first answer the first question was great so thank you but they
had some other challenges as well and so we discontinued our working relationship
now they applied again this year for the dollars that we had to say no based on
some of the challenges that we faced in the past and also your a statement in
reference to the losses well thank you very much for that and I appreciate very
much if we could have this reviewed and any corrections on our names and it
Actos we would appreciate that councilmember Washington thank you madam
president thank you John for what you do we had this discussion about the 575
vouchers and I asked you at that time if you were reaching out regionally and you
said no so I hope that has changed and that you are now going to the Greater
Lansing area rather than lose those vouchers well because we need to have a
regional approach to this absolutely and our grant from HUD says Lansing and the
Greater Lansing and the balance of Ingham County is how it reads
however we sometimes because of locations in a lack of transportation
that people want to you know come to this area well that’s nice but if they
need a place to stay let a man in place yes they have to make that decision
themselves we can’t push them although we’re working and hoped with some a
couple of new development we can hazlit with a couple of new
developments and east lansing as well but again the majority want to flock too
well and I would think they would prefer this over being homeless so – thank you
the other thing is is I notice a lot of the money here and when my colleague
asked why do we have so much homelessness I think we have to
acknowledge that we have a mental health crisis we have an addiction crisis we
have an alcohol crisis and we have a lack of skill crisis and a lot of what I
see going out is for children and that’s great but it’s the adults that are gonna
change the lives of those children and I’m really I would much rather see a
whole lot more money going to community mental health on National Council on
alcoholism some educational opportunities for adults I would like to
see that rather than continuing I mean we have to keep people comfortable don’t
get me wrong but rather than to put all of our emphasis on keeping people
comfortable in their poverty I would like to see much more resources going to
helping to lift them out and scaffold through things like education care free
medical community mental health substance acute detox a there’s just not
that much money going to these critical services okay what I will provide for
you is a copy of the federal dollars this is just City dollars and you’ll see
where with community mental health we recognize what you’re saying we’re
moving their budget from 50 to 75 thousand dollars this year now they also
get federal $4 the substance abuse issues we work with them as well and
they get direct dollars it’s passed through dollars from us to that program
and a number of others that address when we look at our program in our year in
summary the key car reasons for homelessness substance abuse mental
health at the top and then one of the other things that’s added to those
numbers has been the number of landlords that have failed and you know their
houses go into foreclosure so we track all of that through the federal system
but to help you to understand the total dollar amount
we will prepare for you the dollars that that there’s a three million that we’re
getting and the agencies that receive you know some of that and the
accountability that’s involved and I and I would appreciate that because although
a lot of these are very nice and very fluffy
I think we really need to spend our dollars on the meat and potatoes and
really help people get to a place in life where they don’t have to depend on
that right in the house that they’re living in with a crummy landlord and
that we don’t we’re not looking at five thousand people in the Lansing region
that are homeless and I mean we really need to start addressing the issues I
think when you see this get that you tomorrow we have that but this was
focusing on you know city of Lansing dollars here but sure thank you thank
you very much Joan councilmember Dunbar thank you for being here I would like to
clarify maybe I understand what you’re saying it takes a while for the books to
catch up but with st. Vincent Catholic Charities being listed on here as st.
Vincent Catholic Charities who gets the money now
st. Vincent’s to portlet it’s not get that money this is a different program
okay so it goes to st. Vincent’s to Paul can we update that yeah that’s what they
talked about it I just I guess I’m looking at Angie more than that’s I
really I know you said that earlier okay just go with Joan on that I’ll have to
find out what account we’re talking about what I see which one here but I’ll
yeah which one it should be but there are several in here that need to be
changed so we will definitely do that and give you the update okay and then in
the contracts that all of the subcontractors signed there is a pretty
lengthy Equal Employment Opportunity provision that is spelled out in there I
know that I can’t guarantee everybody reads the whole thing when it goes
through but I know one thing that maybe we could do is add another page and just
attach the Human Rights Ordinance like just the little clauses as a separate
page because at the county when you go through it’s part of the it’s part of
the contract but it’s not part of the lane
written in the contract it’s like and I’ll talk with Jim’s office in reference
to that the only one agency that’s given us the Blues about that has been the
Lansing City rescue mission and we can’t go through and change the boilerplate
language for an agency we can try to address their concerns because of the
great work that they’re doing but we’re not going to change our expectations
right awesome okay any other questions for Joan seeing none
we want to thank you very much for coming down and for the work that you do
and the lives that you change thank you very much well you guys be voting on
this later the budget that that will come on the 20th have questions on
anything though we’ll make sure that we reach out to you and I just want to make
sure that a couple of council members will recuse themselves but yes yep all
right and we’ll make sure we do that with that we have Nexus IT as IT is
getting set up I want to go quickly to a which is the noise waiver for weekend
for the rehabilitation of Cesar Chavez Avenue this is okay this is to approve
it because the same night that we have the public hearing on the tonight the
hearing tonight and they needed to prove tonight
so with that vice president Spadafore I move the resolution for public hearing
no having to allow work to allow for work on weekdays and weekends for the
period of April 29th through October 10th 2019 from water main work and
milling and resurfacing of Cesar Chavez in Washington Avenue there’s three areas
on that if you’d like me to read which those are no that’s a cake and the
motion is before us and again we have the public hearing tonight and
there is a great deal of outcry from the public
we will also be passing this to make sure that they make their contracts all
those in favor say aye aye opposed same sign hello sir good I think you start with
your presentation absolutely can everyone hear me if the
green lights on we’re good I just want to make sure it’s high up a tendency to
sometimes be soft-spoken the mission of the IT department is to enable citizens
centered government in collaboration with business units or the departments
with the city of Lansing and facilitate responsive cost-effective innovative
solutions and we’ve distilled that down to be we are smart city focused we are
hoping to take the city from the way we used to do business to a new paradigm of
doing business where we’re more efficient and we’re smarter and how we
use I want to spend a couple of minutes today because I know it came up on how
the IT budget is built a lot of the department heads ask me that and I’ve
been watching videos and so I know that that was one of the questions perfect so
the operational budget so in IT land there’s two budgets um there’s
operational budget and there’s the capital budget for those who we hear
that know that that’s great but I also want to make sure that those who are
watching understand that as well the operational budget is for the items that
we already own and supporting those services so think of contractual
services that will be companies like general code that helps us with the
laser fee system we called them in when we need big guns we use a company called
wit who helps us with the data analytics platform do pointer does infrastructure
services then you have software maintenance and software is probably
outside of personnel then the next largest item that existence out of our
budget and that software is a Marriott of things that exist inside of the city
so today we support over 57 software programs internally Hardware I
know there was some discussion on infrastructure services and how much
space police video is taking up that is part of that hardware budget and that’s
how we fund the expansion and the support of that going forward
miscellaneous operating is kind of the things that makes my department run
internally so niceties of like having coffee or water that’s how we we fund
that stuff as well as small trinkets if someone needs an accessory for their
phone we fund that out of that telecommunications is both phone your
desk phones as well as all of the circuits that connect the locations
together so if you think of a park department being able to talk to City
Hall being able to talk to the data centers that’s what ties it all together
and then last but not least training so it’s no surprise I started
three years ago the city of Lansing had we have two types of employees inside of
the IT department we had people that were mainframe operators that we
retooled to be able to do some of the work that we do in a modern environment
and they’re doing an incredible job but we had to train them and then what we
also have is people that are you knew were to the IT industry and they’re
fresh out of college they’re at making a huge impact as well in bringing energy
to the department and we incorporate the training component so on the next slide
we’ll be have is the chargeback model and you get to see the smorgasbord of
everything that we’re charging back with and how we rebuild that budget so to
give you a comparison of what our operational budget looks like and you
compare us to industry norms today if you take roughly about 870 employees and
you take 6.3 million dollars we are paying about five thousand seven hundred
and twenty seven dollars per employee but the national average is that people
are paying seven thousand nine hundred per employees so we are about twenty
percent lower than national average and we somehow or
another make it happen so the capital budget this is kind of a new paradigm
and what we started to do is I meet with every department head and what we try to
figure out is what are the goals for that department what are the
deficiencies or operational efficiencies that we need to bring and we prefer that
they do not give us what software they want but they define business problem
and when we understand the business problem we then try to find solutions
that we will be able to meet their business challenges and so what we do is
we rank we rank the problems based on business value or opera organizational
risk and the idea behind that is something with the largest business risk
and the largest business value organizational risk business value those
are the projects that have become priority one projects and we want to
grease the skids and make sure those things happen then the next and that
will be at the enterprise level the next level will be at a departmental level
and we rank the same way and those will be our p2 projects based on risk and
value and then we finally go to medium anything that’s considered medium those
are the nice to haves so when we looked if you look at the side that says
priorities it kind of outlines what I just said to you so you have high
business risk high business value high business risk Department high business
risk value for department and then medium business risk medium business
value so looking at the projects that were approved by the mayor’s office so
we come up with these priorities and we sit down with the mayor’s office and we
make a recommendation and so the SEP budget for this year is five projects
and we consider these to be the highest organizational risk or business value
for the city of Lansing yes sprits Lee no you go ahead okay I saw
her hand up so in in this case right so the fire RMS the product that we use is
Seoul and that is considered to be end-of-life
the fire department requires a records management system it is mandated and so
that is a high business risk the value is debatable but it’s a business risk
sense that we have to address it I’m gonna come back to iPad sapphire in one
second because that’s going to make a little bit more sense if I do it later
computers for fire so that if the fire department has computers that has to be
ruggedized and they’re about ten years old and it is time for those to be
replaced and those computers run roughly about four thousand dollars a machine
because they’re built to be for extreme circumstances cold weather something
falls on it it continues to operate and the same thing with the police
department and so what we’re looking at is we have to replace those computers
were both police and fire which is driving up the capital improvement
projects for the city of Lansing and then last but not least you’ve seen this
before we’re continuing to replace old work stations throughout the city and so
you have that hundred thousand dollar placeholder iPads for fire the city of
Lansing did well the city of Lansing Colin did a
ride-along with the fire department and I went to a couple fire runs and it was
an amazing day i opening and i discovered that what they have in front
of the fire trucks is they call it an MDT mobile device unit or something to
that effect it’s really just a computer and all this computer does is they
accept calls from the CAD system but they don’t need anything else and we are
partnering with Ingham County to deploy a mobile application that will do the
same thing and instead of buying a $4,000 computer you can buy an iPad that
changes and cost around a thousand to fifteen hundred dollars basically saving
75 percent of the money that we would have spent on a computer so giving you a
background on those items so the capital budget we get to see next slide please
thank you how things get included on my Kalin sure sorry wait this bad boy sorry
in robberies specifically on this line you mentioned the fire computers for
fire that our lease is up and we need to replace the machines so with a 10-year
lease on computers no no bids so clarification we did an interim lease
because their computers were that bad okay and the interim lease was for one
year and the reason why we did it for one year was because panasonic who makes
the tough books they only go up to 32 gigs of ram sorry if I’m talking their
talk but they only go up to 32 gigs of ram and a newer model sorry the only
went to 16 gigs of ram and a new model goes up to 32 gigs of ram and we know
that the computer is going to be around for five years so we didn’t want to lock
them in into a situation where the new model comes out would sure be better for
long term needs for them and they would track the last year you replaced the 10
year old machines well we’ve run a lease now and you’re this $90,000 to buy new
computers – the iPads correct and well it’s yes and to add on the creative
leasing that we did a hundred percent of the dollars that we put to do that one
year lease will be rebated back to the city okay and so we’ve lost basically we
were able to get loaner computers for your Panasonic for one year at no cost
to the city of Lansing okay thank you all right so capital budget so as I sit
down with the departments and we explore their needs if there is an enterprise
project something that affects multiple departments we include that into the IT
budget we gravitate we say look we’re going to work towards those and then
anything that its departmental facing if it’s more than $15,000 those go in today
tea budget so I know there was questions about a $15,000 Laserfiche thing because
it was $15,000 or less that would exist in the courts budget because and what’s
not an enterprise project and it didn’t gravitate to the point where we would
incorporate into I team any questions please place president Spadafore thank
you madam president so I just have a I guess I was gonna
save these for the end but you brought it up here so $15,000 might not
gravitate to the level of enterprise or sort of Department above or whatever the
standard is but why would courts be assessed for Fire Department technology
when they clearly need a piece of software and they’re being assessed
quite a bit for technology now come to find out also for phone which is part of
this budget so courts is not being assessed for fire technology I’m not
sure well yeah if new computers for the fire department our enterprise fund the
determined that dictates priority one spending from your drum the IT
department we talked about for sip yes okay out of that seven million dollars
that goes into IT right that the SIP comes out of IT seven seven million
dollar annual funding now with standing the operation staff that correct sip
comes from where sip comes from if you go to page 39 of 40 one of the other
funds I lined it of detail it displays the IT budget and it shows the incoming
monies and the monies being spent the the capital projects that we’re talking
about amount to $800,000 of those amounts you’ll see that charges coming
from departments is actually six point three million dollars so it’s less than
that amount the amount that is being funded through capital the vast majority
of that is actually coming from prior year monies that have accumulated in the
fund and the reason for treating this and it’s a lot like our fleet fund like
a what we call a I’m sorry a internal service fund is
that all the departments are charged there’s a few different reasons for that
but one of those is that any leftover money’s on stays and the fun if it was
in the general fund it would all go back to the general fund this is a way to be
able to fund further IT needs just like our fruit fleet fund I’m sorry is to be
able to be able to somewhat save money for future needs because we know that
there’s going to be ongoing technology needs into the future so it’s a way
that’s if I appreciate that and you’ve answered that question in that way
before but wouldn’t it make sense and be more honest to put every technology need
into the technology budget like the $15,000 sip requests that we got from
courts for Laserfiche which is a technology program that as I understand
we already use yes it’s just an expansion
it’s basically for professional services for the courts correct are they part of
the city of Lansing technically yes so wouldn’t it be more honest than rather
having them request it through a different line item to put it through
the IT budget if there’s a fund balance or surplus in that and that the internal
services fund wouldn’t that make more sense I mean just maybe this is seem to
be a systemic issue that’s sticking in my craw is that every year we sit here
and this has only been my second go-around so I apologize if it doesn’t
happen every year but it’s happened every year I’ve been here Department
budget heads department heads sit here present their budget talk about their
technology needs and don’t feel their technology needs are being addressed
through the large assessments that they pay into the internal services fund
which I don’t argue it’s not being used for good causes but what seems to happen
is their budgets have to absorb a larger increase in other line items to pay for
things that should be provided by the city technology department maybe we
should go to the next slide and I can talk about how the budget is actually
built okay but won’t that still not address my concern that we can certainly
talk about your concern you know with it and so what you’re talking about it’s a
style thing right do we does IT take every technology
component and absorb it into there and budget there was a business decision
that we made who this was in a previous administration we made that the
watermark is we absorb it and then if the department wants that fifteen
thousand or ten thousand or whatever that is they will make the business case
for it because IT cannot make the business case for every every component
so maybe any they reverse the reverse of what would happen is a department wants
to get a five hundred dollar conference room phone and they’re requesting that
and IT would then have to fight for every conference room phone or every
small component which will become time-consuming
Angie maybe you can also answer this question then if the courts asked for
fifteen thousand dollars in there what line item was that something like that
yeah so next year when their budgets presented to us is it minus fifteen
thousand and misleading operating or is it now absorbing CIP and we are also
putting another fifteen thousand into their miscellaneous operating budget
that won’t get used on Laserfiche expansion so it would be moved into the
IT budget in the second year in the first year when its first implemented
when it gets into if it goes forward and is in is a something that is to stay
within the budget then it would go over to the IT budget and the assessment
takes care of that correct correct what happens to the line-item for
miscellaneous operating does that go down by fifteen thousand the next year
it wouldn’t be needed correct but it would be somewhat in the ITL occasion
that part make it so we and so if I could if I could clarify to what I was
getting too late earlier when I said about the difference between the
departmental charge basically the departmental charges that the each
department is getting basically funds the IT department so we have ongoing
maintenance that’s needed and ongoing technical support and that’s is what the
departments are being charged the capital now we would like to be able to
charge even more just like with the fleet fund to be able to have a full
replacement of of software and hardware needed going forward but that that’s
obviously competition of needed dollars so in this budget is reflected that
basically the departmental in terms of your question about is the
court for instance subsidizing the the fire budget not in this current budget
year because each of the departments are paying towards the operations of the the
ongoing operations of the department that helps it on excluding the capital
correct because the capital is coming from prior your monies that’s what’s on
the next line okay so in the next slide the ask was and before you go any
further just a couple of announcements one we are feed to the public they’re
working on so if somebody comes in and it’s in the middle of this on city TV we
are working on that the other is we realize that it is time for council the
council meeting but will you are continuing with our committee of a whole
and finishing up with the IT budget and we’ll continue that until we have our
council meeting councilmember Dunbar did you have a question that played with the
same questions that councilmember Spadafore was or is it something else I
did but I’m gonna let the president Hayden goes I see the next slide okay
thank you okay so the ask for this year with sip and operational budget we were
seven point one three six million dollars to seven point 1 million dollars
and because the IT department carries a fund balance the idea behind the fund
balance is to take the sting out of large capital expenditures that will
take place so if you think of an IT department we buy we buy your product so
you’re number one it’s high cost and then it drops and then five years later
we have to buy that product again so there’s this huge hill and valley and
what the fund balance allows us to do is take some of that and we reduce how much
you have to spend going into from year one to year five so you don’t have as
extreme highs and lows and it makes the department more predict
so in this case with the fund balance that we had we have six point three
million dollars and we – Department specific charges and what is the
department specific charge if there’s a piece of software that is only used by a
specific department we do not charge all departments for it
for example the the HR department does not use the police records management
system so therefore we do not charge the operational cause for the police records
management system to HR we charge that exclusively to the police department I’m
sure you guys you all get the idea behind that so you – 460 and so what is
going back or a spread across all of the departments is four I’ve five point
eight million dollars that five point eight million dollars what we do is
equation is showed below we take that number and we divide it by two and the
idea behind that is sorry take that back to total we divided by two and then we
divided by the total number of users inside of the city which is eight
hundred and fifty eight hundred and seventy
we want to get all of the computers all of the users inside of the city and we
charge half of that number because you have some departments that are heavy
with people so they have a lot of people very few computers and you have other
departments that are heavy with computers and very light with people so
they may have a lot of kiosks or kind of front desk type machines and so we
distribute the cost and so here’s an example for Parks and Rec they have 24
employees 28 computers and they’re charged back for employees is 80,000 and
then it charge back for computers is 108 and giving a grand total of one hundred
and eighty eight thousand dollars just for a point of clarification I’m sorry
you mentioned fund balance and then six point three million dollars I don’t
think that was what you meant what’s the fund balance of the IT department can you repeat your question I think it
I think I think two concepts blended in your statement you said fun balance in
six point three million six point three million is the revenue charges know the
fun balance was exactly seven hundred sixty six thousand that was the fun
balance transfer the balance of the fund balance that was what the fund balance
was for not last year but over the last three years so we save a small amount of
money every year and the goal behind that is when you have a large expense
that’s coming it allows the IT department to fund those expenses so the
city doesn’t have to figure out how to replace in this case three hundred
thousand dollars in so the fund balance was depleted to cover that yes here yes
if it’s chosen to be I mean in this may or may not proposing needs correct thank
you so that concludes the first part right how is our budget built so
strategies for FY nineteen we wanted to improve the performance and stability of
the city’s network we wanted to provide timely quality service to our customers
we wanted to maintain a high security for computing services throughout the
city and we wanted to work with business units to transform workflows utilizing
enterprise applications that exist so the next slide FY nineteen key
performance indicators the city wants to maintain 99.99% uptime across all
services and we achieved ninety nine point nine three so we did not hit the
mark but we wanted to complete 90 percent of our helpdesk tickets within
the SLA and eighty five percent of our tickets were completed mattad meeting
the service level agreements that we have with departments the caveat is is
that you know over the last two years we’ve had an incremental or exponential
increase in the amount of tickets that were processing so when I came on board
with the city of Lansing for you well three years ago we were processing
somewhere in the neighborhood of three thousand tickets and fifty percent of
them were completed within one day today we’re in
a situation where we’re processing 9,000 tickets
throughout the city and in that 9,000 tickets
78% of them are being completed in one day and the added caveat is we had a dip
in personnel this fiscal year so we went from four people operating to helped us
to two people operating the hotel so also to give you an idea of what ratios
look like typically organizations strive for 1 to 70 so for every 70 people or
computers you have one person at the help desk today we’re operating when we
have four people at a much lower number than that so it’s closer to one to two
hundred take quick clarification on the information that you just provided as if
if we are up in the number of help tickets and we’ve been buying new
equipment what do you see as the downfall is that the user or is it the
equipment it’s not the equipment some of it is related to projects so for example
if a new project goes live and more technologies being introduced into
multiple departments you’re going to have an increase in tickets because
service transition is where you start to have most of your complaints so to use
an example we just did an update on the wreck track system it hasn’t been
updated for several years I named Parks and Rec when that project goes live
there’s an increase in tickets because it’s a service transition the police
department just went from one body camera body cam vendor to another body
cam vendor to find synergies and to have a better architecture the number of
tickets with LPD increased because there was a service transition and what
eventually happens is it stabilizes after the product goes live alright
thank you so next slide we are seeing a need for
after-hours support the after-hours support
we haven’t had a ton of tickets that’s in that world it’s about 160 I know it’s
a little bit of an eye chart and the the busiest day for after our support is on
Sundays but the biggest consumer of putting in tickets and after for after
our support is either a the police department or be the City Clerk’s office
and the City Clerk’s office is usually when it’s around election time we get a
need for support as well as the police department obviously if their computers
are down or they’re not able to operate we need to provide assistance so there
is we are currently working with the mayor’s office to come up with a plan to
address after our support utilizing the resources that we have next slide please
thank you external sorry that’s a typo on that
that should be external security overview so the city of Lansing thrives
to be we’re pushing to be better at cybersecurity and if you look at that
blue ribbon that is where our contemporaries are and as you can see we
operate above the bar so the investments that we made for the last three years we
have a better ranking and you know my mom will be disappointed because I’m not
all A’s but we are doing very good from a cybersecurity perspective the vendor
that we use that ranks us actually compares all government agencies and
we’re ranked better than 99% of our contemporaries as far as cyber security
is concerned from an external perspective from an internal perspective
next slide you will see that while we’re operating below the bar there is an
issue where we’re not quite where we want to be so in this graph what you
will see is red it’s obviously the worst yellow you’re kind of in the middle
green 330 below with that rank score you’re actually in the best place so we
are currently working with department heads and some of the technology inside
of the city of Lansing is somewhat antiquated and we’re working
with vendors and pushing them to upgrade critical systems in order to make sure
that citizens data is safe workstation replacement so we completed the
replacement of 115 workstations inside of the city of Lansing and we’re current
we’re currently moving in a trend of we want to have a five-year replacement
plan and all computers inside of the city the advantage of doing that is from
a cybersecurity perspective obviously we’re safe from a business perspective
people don’t want computers dead or 9 10 years old because it makes them less
efficient in what they do completed projects in this fiscal year this is a
smorgasbord we’ve touched quite a bit of departments and upgrading their
technology we’ve also done some outside facing projects where we’ve created
lists groups where committees and a whole are able to access city resources
and it was a low-cost solution to a problem that would have been cost
prohibitive and then the remaining projects for this fiscal year this
fiscal year was unique in the sense that we had a lot of multiple priorities we
have departments we’re looking to implement new things and some of them
increase the helpdesk ticket load we also had other smaller projects that
were throwing at us that we had to slip step through the system but we’re hoping
to finish these projects that are slated to be finished in June by the end of
this fiscal year major project enterprise content
management the quartz is just about finished with their efile system with
their records management system so we’ll be one of the pioneers in this area with
records management we’ve already Colin for city TV were on slide 19 please
thank you thank you we’ve also worked on we’re working with HR to finish up some
stuff with Labor Relations workflow inside of that same system there’s a
foil workflow that we worked with both the police department and the office of
City of attorney to work through and that will be going live hopefully in the
next month or so we built all of the web forms inside of a workflow where we can
measure citizen interaction and departments will then it be able to
route inside of that same system and then we’re integrating with GIS and data
analytics systems so we can see exactly what’s taking place and you can map data
to parcels and you know some stuff that will bring some cool efficiency to the
departments and last but not least some I’m sure you guys are not tired of
hearing about medical marijuana or marijuana we are we did the marijuana
applications online and we’re working with the City Clerk’s office to test
that so we will streamline the entire workflow where people can upload their
business cases and it will route appropriately throughout the city
through your plan we want to continue to expand the connectivity for City use we
want to continue the city it’s a cybersecurity program we want to do more
workflow optimization and we want to utilize data to make data-driven
decisions for the city of Lansing to become a smart city smart cities it’s a
buzzword and now and everyone tries to sell you technology but the three other
components that you know we’re working in conjunction with the mayor’s office
is we want to do data-driven decisions we want to engage citizens with the city
and then we want a level of transparency and
so everything over the next three years it is my recommendation that we continue
to do smart city driven type things wireless
I know wireless was a hot topic so I want to talk about wireless the city of
lansing uses two different wireless systems today we use cellular for
cameras for public safety cameras but we are looking to deploy Wi-Fi
strategically for multiple reasons the Wi-Fi make sure I can be heard the Wi-Fi
adds a couple things right there’s SEPA events or events that
happens inside of the parks and the IT department spent an exorbitant of time
setting up for things like calming ground or other events that will happen
and so Wi-Fi in the parks will reduce the amount of time that we spent with
personnel doing that that’s set up because then you can flip a switch and
turn it on the other part that it provides is if there’s someone that
wants to do an event they can actually rent it that Wi-Fi for that period of
time and they can utilize it as a private thing so think of a race that
may happen they can use that to upload the race results and not have to tether
off their cell phone or they can have it as a private thing if they’re having
vendors come in so they can perform sales the other thing that Wi-Fi does is
there’s a public safety component so when you you use Cellular for all of the
city cameras you’re now paying cost for each camera but if you have a Wi-Fi
system in place you can piggyback all the cameras on that same Wi-Fi system
and the advantage with that is there’s better bandwidth better throughput
better quality of video and it allows us to now have that public safety component
so and then the last which is not on the budget for this year but we are pushing
to try to see if we can get this in a city there’s a third wireless component
which is called Laura I know Laura is a foreman a foreign term but think of
Laura as a low bandwidth high distance Wi-Fi
network and warrant that would provide to our citizens is you can have
basically IOT or Internet of Things devices connecting to it so think of
garbage cans if they have a small sensor inside of it they could connect to the
Lauren network and report their status and if someone didn’t pick up that you
can now measure that think of Laura being used in parking meters you put it
in a parking meter and instead of the battery having to be changed once a year
or twice a year a Laura device the meter battery will last 20 years without
requiring replacement because it’s very low voltage very high distance and so I
know Wireless is why do we need wireless in the city because smart cities are
about connectivity and these three connection our connectivity verticals
will allow us to better meet the needs of our citizens Connor I don’t want to
rush you but could you speed it is the next few pages so that we can get to
some questions yes I’m fishing I’m soccer security so from a fishing
perspective that is the number one threat with the city we have done a
really good job at cybersecurity but the biggest risk is between the keyboard and
the cheer and so from a government perspective the biggest 74% of the
breaches is what they call cyber espionage is just basically fishing
events and so we want to continue to push for the citizens or the people who
work for the city to address that so confirmed security breaches inside of
government 47,000 of them exist out of 54,000 total is in our sector and that’s
because of 74 percent of its fishing you understand and it’s a major deal next
actually the next one was a video I sped it off I want to show how easy it is for
a phishing attack to take place in the city basically you have free services
you can go ahead and start the video you have free services that are out there
Google hotmail whatever and what a hacker does is they will basically
Google any one of the members here or may assure us information which is what
I I do here I’m waiting for the video to show and by googling the information
they can create an account that looks like Andy sure and then they will send a
request hey look I want you to be able to do this and we’re more apt to respond
if the mayor is sending it if a City Councilmember is sending it matter of
fact I know that there’s people who are sitting in front of me today that’s
gotten a fake email from an Andy sure account and it is probably the largest
risk that we have from a cyber security perspective in the city and because of
that cyber security training is the most important thing if you can jump over to
the slide that it has the computer password reset from my fake Andy sure
account police here’s the video okay jump to the next slide so in that
frake fake gmail account I sent an email that looks to be Andy Shore next slide
please for my folks in the back and the only way you can tell is if you expand
the details when you expand the details then you see that is not Andy sure but
you can see it’s auntie shura three two zero took his date of birth and created
an account in Gmail and you can see that it is not him and that is one of the
challenges that faces it so what we do in the city is we have a very strong
cyber security training program and the goal behind that cyber security training
program why do we keep doing it it’s because through repetition we’re able to
reduce the people who are fish prone from 27 percent down to 2 percent and we
want to continue to raise the bar with compliance with cybersecurity workflow
optimization for my friends in the back we’re not gonna wait on the slides we
need ok workflow optimization we want we’re working with department heads to
reduce the number of printed records that are inside to the city so today you
have departments that print records and they file it inside of a vault and what
we’re hoping to do with operation clean desk is reduce the number of paper
records that exist and start to use the systems like laserfiche in order to
archive that that data we want to start to convert things that are web forms or
fully deployed out throughout the city we want to scan legacy documents and
make them available appropriately you know to citizens and make it available
to just the people who work inside of the city and last but not least we want
to do data-driven decisions data-driven decisions is you take multiple things
and you throw it inside of a pot right you have a strategy or shared vision
data policies and based on that you’re able to do data-driven decisions
and so we’ve built the departmental type dashboards we found synergy between
departments and we want to move to the predictive prescriptive modeling and
then in final slide the progression of data analytics so you start off with
reporting what does things look like then you want to build correlations
between departments and throughout the organization and figure out why did it
happen ultimately you want to start to provide
insights when will this happen again and ultimately you want to get to the point
where you become prescriptive everyone has an app where you can check your
credit score it says hey if I do this what happens to my credit score we want
the city to be able to be able to play around with the levers and wonder hey if
I pull this lever how does it affect crime if I pull this lever how does it
affect homelessness if I pull this lever and you can figure out and a high degree
of accuracy what the variables are and how they can impact the city and so that
is the end of my person can’t remember Dunbar thank you question so starting
with your actual budget page where we have 39 of 41 the first line on there is
revenues charges to funds I think one of the things that was confusing and a lot
of folks you know understanding is that revenue chargeback these are charge
backs to departments so it looks like it’s revenues coming into the department
but these are actually the expenses of the individual departments that you
collect and charge back so yes so for for me to help to help me understand it
I had to take a look at all of the individual IT budgets from every
department add them together and go oh six point three million dollars so that
made sense for me as I know that we were we were struggling with that last week
the other thing that I wanted to ask is how do you determine the allocation you
you get you’ve divided it out by person and by station to make it as equal as
possible across the board but the costs that that you determine
are needed that’s 6.3 million when it is put into the department budgets what
part do you have control over do you put only the line in that says IT or do you
have control over all the other lines that we were looking at and when we were
asking department heads and they say oh that’s technology – do you put that in
there or do they put that in there how does how does that jive because I think
that that was really confusing for folks finding out that in multiple departments
there was the IT chargeback line and there was other IT and I know you tried
to explain some of that earlier with CIP that’s only related to one department
but do you have control over that so the IT chargeback is what I build I have a
spreadsheet that comes up and builds that magical formula based on the number
of devices we support so it’s the IT chargeback that’s in my universe okay so
when there isn’t a charge in a department budget that’s outside of that
that is also for IT do you put it there if it’s not a charge mark I do not put
it there okay so I think that we were all thinking that we were gonna get
answers about all those multiple lines when he got here and he doesn’t it says
it doesn’t sound like you control this and some of my departments and I’m
without calling out any departments I know some departments have legacy items
that they call technology and they may use it for something else so if you look
at my budget the detail of my budget there isn’t something that says
telecommunications it’s telephone and some of that is you know renaming that
in the financial system is kind of messy but telephone in my world is telephone
telephone communications and all of the circuits but it may just be a limitation
of the financial system with renaming that that line item I don’t know could
you give an example of what other charges like even in when when not even
District Court there was one in HR there was like $15,000 in HR that we asked
what’s that for and it was an IT line but it’s not part of his IT line so I
was asking did he that in there or did they put that in
there and and do you have control over that so because we were yeah we were
confused because there was multiple places and we thought it would all be in
one IT line so if it falls below that $15,000 threshold then it can be within
the department but otherwise it’s generally in the IT budget now there I
will say one other exception there was one other exception because of the
mobile of the Parkes funded to the Parkes millage because that’s obviously
additional funding that can augment what we can fund through the allocations so
there is one other exception to that that’s because of an additional funding
source okay I will sorry I would also say that consolidating everything into
the IT budget the maturity level of the organisation is really low as far as
that’s concerned right this is something that started three or four years ago and
even today I find that there is I’ll have a vendor reach out to me and say
hey by the way you know no one has paid this bill and we would discover another
IT or technology thing under a stone so some departments continue to carry that
not a hundred percent sure why but I do know that there’s still technology
components that hasn’t made it over to my budget yet and as we find them we
Corral them and we give them a home and a home there okay okay so another one
that I had written down here is years ago and it’s been a while now since we
did this whole transfer of some of the services to do point I remember there
was like a fire and brimstone debate about that up here about contracting out
services to folks who are not city employees at this point in time what
footprint what what is left of the footprint of that so dew point on track
been used to manage the infrastructure services and project management for the
city of Lansing so we have one project manager and a few infrastructure folks
supporting us from dew point okay but are they are they like
I guess what is their role then is it just in the backend it is just in the
backend so they were taking care of servers and switches and and then there
is some project management that happens which is more in the front-end but that
was around for some time as well okay I’m the subject of the Wi-Fi that she
brought up that was in the parks and I think you specified the idato park you
had said something about renting it it could potentially be used as a SEPA I I
don’t think it is at the moment and but it can be something where you’re having
it’s not something that would be turned on and then turned off right no just
something that they would be getting a dedicated 5g yes for that it wouldn’t be
5g but it’ll be Wi-Fi yes it’d be Wi-Fi okay and then the final question that I
have is with regard to you would mention that there’s a lot of tickets for After
Hours service and I’m commend to you because the fact that you’ve gone from
30,000 tickets to 90,000 tickets or three was it three thousand to nine
thousand I’m adding a zero didn’t mean to with less people and your your your
numbers are up as far as when you’re when they’re resolved to get us back
over the 85% what how much is needed in the budget to do that like what would
you need in order to get us to a place where we could staff to do all the
after-hours stuff so that’s a hybrid right we have openings inside of the
department for roughly about six people while we understand the ratio is seventy
to one we think that we can function with six people three dedicated to
public safety and three dedicated to the rest of staff and my guess is that we
don’t have a high volume but to do on-call as well as to support once you
do on-call you have to pay someone for three hours once you call them according
to the CBA it is my estimation you’ll be somewhere around forty to fifty thousand
dollars in order to do 24 by seven support with the existing
positions that we have inside of the city you didn’t ask for that and we’re
working on it I guess we need to see whether or not
other departments yeah okay thank my nonce members it’s Lee thank you madam
president you said something which i think is is
key I mean the the IT department and you being director of IT is you you’re
relatively young you’re three years old right roughly yes and so you know I I’ve
heard with amusement that you know you’re still finding you know things
that should be on the IT budget but all in all I think that when I look at some
of your metrics um dew point for example I don’t quite remember fryer and
brimstone but I do remember a lot of questions being asked about the dew
point contract and and and rightly so you know if we have folks working on
contract and we’re not hiring them that was a problem and I see that you you
significantly lowered that are some of those dew point people the After Hours
support that Cathy’s talking about you do some after our support for major
items so for example if you have infrastructure item fail
dew point handles that where we are lacking as if a computer fails that’s
critical for LPD if a computer fails that is critical for fire today they
have to wait till next business day in order for us to provide the support that
they need and then just too much the other thing is so what I’m understanding
and hearing from both Angie and maybe you miss Bennett and you is that that
the threshold is is $15,000 anything about $15,000 in is goes under the
heading of the IT budget is that what you’re that what I heard from you that
has been we may be revisiting that policy but yes that’s what it has been
yet okay all right that’s I can’t remember the last one so you
know that’s it thank you okay I have two quick questions and then I don’t see any
other hands and then we’ll move on we bonded a couple years back for new
computers do you remember Angie what that amount
was off the top of your head I’m thinking it was three million dollars I
can’t remember it was a three year bond it’s now expired it was for hardware as
well as hardware and software there was a lot of infrastructure and security
things and was the debt service paid out of the IT budget yes yes okay can you
get me the amount of what the bond was and what the debt service was expired I
want to I heard you okay but I want to know what those numbers were all right
thank you Thank You Collin with that we will move
on we have one final item before we go into our council meeting we are to
number B which is the seventh amendment to the amended and restated real estate
purchase and development agreement between the city of Lansing and
continental Ferguson Lansing LLC if you will look at your desk you receive two
items that were emailed to Council one was the agreement that had the changes
that were blue and changes that were red those were ones that we had been
currently working off of you will also see at your desk a resolution which
outlines the changes which are in the where forth there there whereas clause
which is on page one of five and then in the
amendments on page two of five which are three four five and B of 14 these were
items that were discussed during the presentation and we had asked for more
clarification and better understanding of what those were and those have been
revised with the city attorney and with continental Ferguson are there any
questions on these all right seeing no questions what we need is a motion to
move this out on the floor for tonight for passage vice president Spadafore I
move item 6b all right we have motion to move this out for a vote the seeking all
those in favor say aye aye opposed passes unanimously at this
time we will adjourn committee of a whole we will take a three-minute recess
and then come back into the council meeting

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