NCARB Centennial: Favorite Committees

NCARB Centennial: Favorite Committees


The process that NCARB has of working with potential leaders and those on a leadership track of engaging them in so many different committees helps to give you a very well-rounded background as you prepare to lead the organization. Over my years at NCARB, I served on over 40 committees and task force. I was chair of 15. They’ve all been meaningful, and enjoyable, and informative. Many, many of the leaders of NCARB over the years have started out in ARE, which is very intense. My first committee was lateral forces. I wrote for lateral forces for about three years. The first NCARB committee that I served on was section G. That was the old mechanical equipment segment of the exam and then ultimately, I ended up being chair of the Exam Committee. One of the more interesting one was the future title task force. That was a very diverse group and we really had some wonderful discussions. The whole idea of technology that was a series of committees that I was on. Well, I worked on the interiors task force spec a while back and I’m currently on the interior architecture workgroup. We’re exploring the definition of what is interior architecture. Actually, before I was on IDP Committee, I worked on some task force and it was core competencies, linking core competencies. Favorite committee that I was on I think would have to be the Intern Development Program Committee. The Intern Development Program Advisory Committee, I enjoyed that as well, but I also enjoyed the Procedures and Documents Committee a lot because that’s really when you really started got into the meat and potatoes of the resolutions, and handbooks, and things like that. My favorite committee, Procedures and Documents, allowed people to focus on the broader issues of practice and the relationship of the professional to society. It was a committee that really dealt with the basic heart issues of NCARB, dealing with procedures, and model laws, and exact the examination process and just essentially the requirements of what it meant to be an architect. My first committee probably was the disaster task force right after Katrina— the charge of which was to identify ways that the Council could assist the states that were affected by the storms in recovery. I’ve worked on sustainable architecture task force, which was very interesting because that was about 10 or 12 years ago when the notion of sustainable design and sustainable architecture wasn’t even … we didn’t know how to define it. The first committee I served on was the Member Board Executives Committee and I think I made some lifelong friends there, but that committee seems to be close to the heartbeat of NCARB and you hear lots of things that are being planned, discussed, looking into the future. What I really have been most satisfied with is the opportunity to have, you know, a platform to listen, and to lead, and to really talk about where we as an organization need to go in the future and how we can really, in an ever-changing time, make sure that we are out in front of things that are important to our society in
terms of the built environment.

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