What Actually Happened at Mount St. Helens? – Geologist Steve Austin

What Actually Happened at Mount St. Helens? – Geologist Steve Austin

Is that a waterfall up there? Yeah, a big one. And that’s a couple hundred feet high. And the whole canyon is 600 feet deep. You’ve been up there? Yeah, that’s a cool place. You can see everything around the volcano. And all of it’s just scoured. Steve, it’s absolutely beautiful here. Just the peaceful

Footage of the 1980 Mount St. Helens Eruption

Footage of the 1980 Mount St. Helens Eruption

NARRATOR: Almost 10,000 feet tall, Mount St. Helens is one of several active volcanoes in Washington’s Cascades mountain range. By 1980, it hasn’t erupted for over a century. But beneath its serene exterior, Mount St. Helens is beginning to stir. On March 27th, red hot magma from deep within the volcano rises high enough to

USA VLOG 34 – Horsetail Falls, Multnomah Falls, Vista House, Mount St.Helens

USA VLOG 34 – Horsetail Falls, Multnomah Falls, Vista House, Mount St.Helens

These trees were planted one by one. It means that people planted back these trees to… …recover nature. There’s one thing I haven’t expected by around the end of my trip. And it is… …this. Clouds, clouds, clouds. And there’s one thing worse than the weather… …the weather forecast. Shitty weather is forecasted for the

Mount Mazama Ash from Crater Lake volcano eruption 7,700 years ago

Mount Mazama Ash from Crater Lake volcano eruption 7,700 years ago

I-90 east of Kittitas near the old Milwaukee Railroad trestle. The freeway rolls through Johnson Canyon here, but look carefully at Milepost 119. It’s gonna go by quick! A brilliant white layer just above the creek bed. What is it? There are plenty of white layers this side of Snoqualmie Pass. Is it Diatomite –

Continuous Gas Monitoring Tracks Volcanic Activity at Mount St. Helens

Continuous Gas Monitoring Tracks Volcanic Activity at Mount St. Helens

Mount St. Helens SNIF Monitoring Station: Continuous gas monitoring improves our ability to track volcanic activity and detect early indications of volcanic unrest Here we are. Mount St. Helens. In the crater. This is the Mount St. Helens “SNIF” site. This is a gas monitoring site that was put in at the end of August